Meditative Reflections on an Unfocused Mind (Part 2)

Continued from Part 1, here are another 10 meditative reflections on an unfocused mind:

27.  Congratulations to you if you have an unfocused mind!

28.  I repeat: your “attention deficit” is an attention surplus.

29.  Indeed, by not getting stuck on one thing, you manage to track many things.

30.  A distractible mind is an agile mind.

31.  A mind that cannot be distracted is a non-reactive mind.  That’s an evolutionary minus.

32.  A mind that is easily distracted is a reactive mind. That’s an evolutionary plus.

33.  Recognize: mind is hopelessly one-track: mind is zero-sum: mind is “either/or.”

34.  Recognize: distractibility is mind’s attempt to keep track of more than one thing at a time.

35.  Recognize: distractibility is an openness to stimuli, an openness to context.

36.  That’s why I keep saying: “attention deficit” is actually “attention surplus.”

 

From “Attention Surplus: Rethinking ADD” (P.  Somov, 2012)

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About Pavel Somov, Ph.D.

My intent is to help you reclaim eating moments of your life with meaning and moderation; to help you leverage self-acceptance and compassion; and to help you rediscover your essential self. Pavel Somov, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist and the author of "Eating the Moment" (New Harbinger, 2008), "Present Perfect" (NH, 2010), "The Lotus Effect" (NH, 2010), "Smoke Free Smoke Break" (2011), and "Reinventing the Meal" (in press, 2012). He is in private practice in Pittsburgh, PA. http://www.eatingthemoment.com http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pavel-somov