Knit Your Congressman a Uterus

A bill in bill in Virginia that would require women to submit to an ultrasound before getting an abortion has prompted outcry from feminists and women’s rights activists around the nation. Some people are calling their Senators. Others are marching on the street. But a group called Government Free VJJ is taking a more unconventional approach…

via Mother Jones:

America’s elected leaders, particularly those of the Republican male variety, have not done too well by women lately.

In Arizona and Kansas, Republican state legislators pushed bills allowing a doctor to lie about the health status of your fetus for fear you might opt to get an abortion. And should you make that harrowing choice, Virginia Republicans, following in the footsteps of their colleagues in a number of other states, passed a law requiring that you have an ultrasound first. (They wanted it to be the kind where the doctor sticks a paddle into your vagina, but public outcry forced them to scale it back to the abdominal kind.)

….the women behind Government Free VJJ have a different kind of approach:

“Follow these simple steps,” the website beckons…

1. Knit or crochet a vagina or uterus
2. Print a message to enclose
3. Mail it to your male Senator or Congressional Representative [links provided]
4. We’re in the process of arranging hand delivery to congressional offices in Washington, until then, go ahead and mail yours in!
5. Record your items in this spreadsheet so we can track which representatives still need to receive a “gift”!
6. Don’t forget to thank your representative if he respects women and supports our rights.

The crochet patterns available so far include uterus and “happy uterus.” For knitters, there’s a vulva, a womb (pictured), felt cervixes, and (hey, why not?)—a “snatchel.”

How’s that for creative activism?

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About Chelsea Roff

Chelsea Roff is Managing Editor for Intent Blog. She is an author, speaker, and researcher writing about science, spirituality, women's health, and humanitarian issues. Visit her website to read past writings, watch video interviews, and see her teaching schedule. You can also follow her on Facebook and Twitter.