Secret of Adulthood: If We’re Too Tired to Do Anything Except TV or Internet, Go to Sleep

IfYoureTooTiredToDoAnythingTVInternet_124902-300x382From Further Secrets of Adulthood: If we’re too tired to do anything except watch TV or cruise the internet, go to sleep.

Agree, disagree?

I have to admit, I struggle sometimes to remember this Secret of Adulthood.  I don’t have trouble getting off the internet, but sometimes I watch TV because I feel too tired to read.

I know, however, that when I’m too tired to read something new, I’m better off re-reading something I’ve read before — such as one of my favorite works of children’s literature. Because they’re familiar, I can enjoy the pleasure of reading, even when my brain feels fried.

I’m a big fan of the pleasures of TV, but I enjoy TV most when it’s demanding. If I’m too tired to read, I’m probably also too tired to watch that kind of TV. I love shows like The Wire or Game of Thrones, for instance, but I can’t watch it when I feel exhausted.

As a sleep zealot, I do try to get myself to go to sleep as soon as I feel sleepy.

What do you think?

 

Also …

BetterThanBeforeMyPhoto-225x300Would you like to learn more about habits — and how to make or break them? Read my book, Better Than Before. It turns out that it’s not as hard as you think to master your habits,once you know what to do. Intrigued? Read an excerpt of Better Than Before.  Or listen to a clip from the audio-book (yes, that’s me, reading).

 

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About Gretchen Rubin

Gretchen Rubin is the author of several books, including the New York Times bestsellers, Happier at Home and The Happiness Project. On her popular blog, The Happiness Project, she reports on her daily adventures in the pursuit of happiness. Gretchen has emerged as one of the most thought-provoking and influential writers on happiness to have emerged from the recent explosion of interest in the subject. Though her conclusions are sometimes counter-intuitive—for example, she finds that true simplicity is far from simple to attain, and that used rightly, money can do a lot to buy happiness—her insights resonate with readers of all backgrounds.