Tag Archives: add

Mildly Medicated: ADD, Normalcy and Finding Acceptance in Music

Pay Attention!

If there were two words that I could have stricken from the English language growing up, it would have been those two. You would think that hearing them countless thousands of times you’d become desensitized, but you don’t, or at least I didn’t. People with ADD, which is very different from ADHD will know what I’m talking about. It has nothing to do with being smart or mental capacity, it’s just that your brain has its own set of commands and protocols that it intends to follow, and getting it to do something completely different and focusing just goes against the grain. In fact, it really wants to do something completely different most of the time, regardless of how much I want it to do what everyone else is doing. It’s not a question of desire; it’s a question of a biological constraint. The sooner you learn to work within that constraint, the easier things become.

There are a lot of very good people who I know I frustrated early on, my mother is one, and this woman has the patience of a saint. She was raising 3 boys on her own, and I’m sure I didn’t make the task any easier for her. My family, my teachers, all people who had the best intentions of trying to help me, sometimes made matters worse. I learn at my own pace. Sometimes that can be slower than normal, and sometimes faster. It depends on the protocol. Thankfully I was able to find a connection with music. Listening to it, understanding it on an intimate level, and being able to play it was somehow within my ADD brain wiring protocol. I must admit that in the beginning I was not very good, but I found out early that my condition seemed to exclude music while my brain usually bounced around from subject to subject, or topic to topic. I realized I was actually able to practice for very long periods of time and get things accomplished. Through music, I was able to be recognized as more normal, or should I say “more acceptable”. I dove into it with everything I had. I knew that in some way, it would be my salvation. Continue reading

Meditative Reflections on an Unfocused Mind (Part 2)

Continued from Part 1, here are another 10 meditative reflections on an unfocused mind:

27.  Congratulations to you if you have an unfocused mind!

28.  I repeat: your “attention deficit” is an attention surplus.

29.  Indeed, by not getting stuck on one thing, you manage to track many things.

30.  A distractible mind is an agile mind.

31.  A mind that cannot be distracted is a non-reactive mind.  That’s an evolutionary minus.

32.  A mind that is easily distracted is a reactive mind. That’s an evolutionary plus.

33.  Recognize: mind is hopelessly one-track: mind is zero-sum: mind is “either/or.”

34.  Recognize: distractibility is mind’s attempt to keep track of more than one thing at a time.

35.  Recognize: distractibility is an openness to stimuli, an openness to context.

36.  That’s why I keep saying: “attention deficit” is actually “attention surplus.”

 

From “Attention Surplus: Rethinking ADD” (P.  Somov, 2012)

www.eatingthemoment.com

www.drsomov.com

photo by: h.koppdelaney

27 Meditative Reflections on an Unfocused Mind


27 meditative reflections on an unfocused mind:

1. A focused mind is a closed mind: to pay attention to one thing is to ignore another thing.

3. Mind is one-track: to pay attention to “this” is to ignore “that.”

4. Attention is zero-sum: to see one thing is to be blind to another thing.

5. That’s how attention works.  And that is normal.

6. To focus is to zoom in.

7. To zoom in is to notice the Small, the Specific, the Particular, the Detail.

8. To zoom in is to ignore the Big Picture, to lose sight of the rest of what exists.

9. Thus, to focus on the Small is to ignore the Large.

10.  Thus, to focus on one thing is to close your mind to the rest of what currently exists.

11.  To focus on a detail, on the specific is to ignore the Context.  And this can be dangerous!

12.  Realize: to pay too much attention to a banana is to ignore a jungle full of snakes.

13.  Understand: hyper-focus is an evolutionary risk.

14.  Realize: sustained attention is costly.

15.  Understand: a hyper-focused mind potentially puts its own body at risk.

16.  Thus, a focused mind is not just a closed mind but also an unsafe mind.

17.  We weren’t built to lose, we were built to survive.  This is true for you, me and all of us.

18.  Understand: your so-called “attention deficit” is not a deficit but an adaptation.

19.  Realize: your so-called “attention deficit” is not a problem but a solution.

20.  Understand: your so-called “attention deficit” is actually a surplus of attention.

21.  An unfocused mind is an open mind.

22.  An unfocused mind is a fluid mind.

23.  An unfocused mind doesn’t get stuck on one thing: it scans the Context.

24.  An unfocused mind is context-ready.

25.  An unfocused mind is open to anything and is thus ever-ready.

26.  An unfocused mind is an evolutionary asset, not an evolutionary liability.

27.  Congratulations to you if you have an unfocused mind!

 

This is an excerpt from my book Attention Surplus: Rethinking ADD, which includes 100 meditative thoughts that reframe the concept of ADD from a strength- and empowerment-based perspective.

www.eatingthemoment.com

www.drsomov.com

photo by: oddsock

Meditation Improves Children’s Attention

A new study published in the International Journal of Yoga found that when children are trained to practice meditation, their attention spans are significantly increased.

The researchers tested two yoga-based relaxation practices involving specific meditation and rest techniques with 208 school children (132 boys and 76 girls) between the ages of 13 and 16 years of age. Their attention spans were tested before and after practicing the two techniques: meditation and rest.

Both meditation and rest improved the childrens’ attentiveness significantly but meditation had the greatest impact on the attention scores, regardless of gender or age of the children.

The study shows that meditation training may be valuable in improving attention in all children, but may especially have a role in the treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly since there are no negative side-effects. 

Who’s Telling You Your Child Has ADHD? It’s More Than Likely Someone Unqualified.

Attention-deficit hyper-active disorder, described as "the co-existence of attentional problems and hyperactivity" with each behavior occurring sporadically. According to the National Institute, two to three percent of children (approximately 5 million) have ADHD, with most symptoms surfacing before the age of seven. Mostly boys are diagnosed, and 65% of children diagnosed have disciplinary problems.

But how many of those children diagnosed with ADHD actually have it?

It’s hard to say, especially considering most diagnoses are not even given by doctors but by school teachers and day care administrators. 

A recent CNN report says:

Many parents begin their struggles with treating their children’s ADHD… with a suggested diagnosis from a school or day care setting. That’s a problem, doctors say, when there could be many other factors contributing to a child’s behavior.

For a teacher to suggest that a child has ADHD is "inappropriate and dangerous," says Dr. Elizabeth Roberts, child psychiatrist in Murrieta, California. Depression, anxiety and abuse are all possibilities in a child’s life that could lead to attention problems, Roberts said. That means that many children are receiving medication for the wrong problem.

Roberts wants to say to all educators: "There are many, many diagnoses that cause these problems, including abuse and depression and anxiety. So please, withhold your judgment."

 

Teachers have a very active role in young students’ lives and have a completely different perspective on a child’s behavior than a parent does. Although a teacher can in fact be an important asset in determining whether your child has ADHD, they should never recommend medication for ADHD with children. First of all,  they aren’t medical professionals and secondly, only ten to twenty percent of children with ADHD actually need medication. Most of all, many of the problems in the clasroom that can be summed up to ADHD, are in fact just down right behavioral problems that stem from problems from the home and just general parenting.

Most kids diagnosed just simply learn different than other students and do not respond well to classroom settings. Many of them simply need a different homework setting, tutors or counseling for issues in the home. ADD and ADHD medicine are very serious drugs to put a child on and should not be done on the whim of anyone’s aside from a licensed professional, as they are derivatives of Meth, basically. 

For all parents who are concerned that their children have an attention disorder, or any disorder for that matter, should consult a physician before jumping to conclusions. ADHD, although now mainstream in the media and news, is not a term to just throw around or a condition that should be treated like the common cold. ADHD is a serious condition that should be diagnosed and treated by a doctor. 

Photo: CC Flickr//*clarity*

Meditation: Effective new aid for students with ADHD

National conference to showcase research and classroom experience during National ADHD Public Awareness Month

A panel of physicians and scientists will report on the benefits of a simple meditation practice for aiding students diagnosed with ADHD during a national medical webinar, which will be hosted by the David Lynch Foundation on Wednesday, September 30, 12 noon (ET).

SOURCE: Eureka Alert.

For more: http://doctorellisor.com/inthenews/meditation-effective-new-aid-for-students-with-adhd

Kids Drugged – Squelching The Genius Within

Why are we as a society so fearful of what may be extraordinary? Gifted artisans, leaders, shamans, yogi’s, spiritual avatars for millenniums have expressed knowledge, acute awareness, paranormal gifts, seeing what others don’t ordinarily see.  Why do we shy away from embracing extraordinary abilities in our youth?  We tend to shut them down in an attempt to normalize them.

Children that laugh, sing, or scream from their inner depths, are sequestered, immediately told to “quiet down”, to turn off creative impulse. Impulse control is vital for safety and neighbors may be disturbed, so we must be mindful. But out in the woods in a safe spot to let expression flow, it also is quieted. We are afraid of what is unusual, out of the mold, out of the cookie cutter realm of the ordinary.

Parents are stressed out; not having adequate support systems, a direct result of the family unit breakdown.  There isn’t a multi-generational family team, often there is only one single parent, struggling to stay balanced, barely able to hold their own psyche together.  We need education for  parents and care –givers on how to handle, communicate, and deal with a gifted child.

The balance between a child’s authentic connection with his or her spirit, expressing it, and fitting in with a co-operative society is a challenge. The solution for handling overactive children is to medicating them, to calm them down, which often creates even more devastating side-effects, including short-term memory loss, fidgeting, anxiety, or a zombie like stare ( compounding symptons they are being treated for).  Drugging young kids, 2- years- old and up, is an accepted solution, despite research that doesn’t know long range, let alone short-term side effects.

We must find answers to the following question – or succumb to drugging kids as a primary solution.

  1. Are these drugs being administered to children addictive?

 Doctor’s have denied it to various friends of mine whose children are on ADD, ADHD, and bi-polar medications. When a 17 year old young man stopped taking a med, he became anxious, suffered insomnia and his doctor’s claimed it was the disorder kicking in again. So, they suggested up the dosage. In this case, the parents insisted that their son receive a battery of tests. It was determined he suffered from diabetes, and the symptoms resembled ADHD, resulting in a sad case of misdiagnosis and the doctor’s giving him the wrong meds.  It’s a vicious cycle when the underlying causes of symptoms are not tested for.

  1. How many cases are misdiagnosed? Is someone you know a possible victim.
  2. Who can you trust for help, advice, in handling a child with off the chart symptoms, including uncontrollable tantrums? What alternatives may be available?

MerrieWay advocates: We need a medical system that doesn’t medicate symptoms, but does a more responsible job in looking at underlying causes. Don’t squelch the creative child out of fear, overload, or pharmaceutical companies profiteering.

We have a drugged out nation regarding anti-depressants and psychotropic meds. Two-year-olds are being medicated with killer drugs, read the side effects. Gee, we don’t have to read, they tell us on TV we could get cancer, commit suicide or die. Liquor ads, cigarette ads have been banned from TV. But, drug use is promoted, making it ‘OK’. 

The psychotropic meds are addictive; just try to get off of Zyprexa, Prozac, or any other drug in these categories. Withdrawal mimics the symptoms that the drugs are supposed to alleviate. The mock Pharma drug trials usually ranging from a 4 to 6 week period, often prove marginally better than a placebo. Overtime use of meds have proven to have even less efficacy than a placebo.

These chemical lobotomies are Big Pharma Biz as usual. No one pays attention until this vicious cycle of no return to baseline wellness happens to their child, loved one, or friend.  This is not referring to patients that have benifited, buty to the specific experimentation on youngsters without proven statistics of the long range effects on brain development and the neurological damage of  high powered meds.

Dumbed and numbed society – is there 2% left among us that are aware, care, or will stand up? MerrieWay is in for the long haul…come on and join us. Take a stand for our kids!

www.merrieway.com

Kids Drugged for Pharma Profit – Slaying The Genius Within

Why are we, as a society so fearful of what may be extraordinary? Gifted artisans, leaders, shamans, yogi’s, spiritual avatars for millenniums have expressed knowledge, acute awareness, paranormal gifts, seeing what others don’t ordinarily see.  Why do shy away from embracing extraordinary abilities in our youth?  We tend to shut them down, attempt to normalize them.

Children that laugh, sing, or scream from their inner depths, are sequestered, immediately told to “quiet down”, to turn off creative impulse. Impulse control is vital for safety and neighbors may be disturbed, so we must be mindful. But out in the woods, in a safe spot to let expression flow, it also is quieted.

Parents are stressed out; not having adequate support systems, a direct result of the family unit breakdown.  There isn’t a multi-generational family team, often there is only one single parent, struggling to stay balanced, barely able to hold their own psyche together.  We need education for  parents and care –givers on how to handle, communicate, and deal with a gifted child.

The balance between a child’s authentic connection with his or her spirit, expressing it, and fitting in with a co-operative society is a challenge. The present solution for handling overactive children is devastating.  Drugging young kids, 2- years-old and up, is an accepted solution, despite research that doesn’t know long range, let alone short-term side effects.

We must find answers to the following question – or succumb to drugging kids as a primary solution.

1.       Are these drugs being administered to children addictive?

 Doctor’s have denied it to various friends of mine whose children are on ADD, ADHD, and bi-polar medications. When a 17 year old young man stopped taking a med, he became anxious, suffered insomnia and his doctor’s claimed it was the disorder kicking in again. So, they suggested up the dosage. In this case, the parents insisted that their son receive a battery of tests. It was determined he suffered from diabetes, and the symptoms resembled ADHD, resulting in a sad case of misdiagnosis and the doctor’s giving him the wrong meds.  It’s a vicious cycle when the underlying causes of symptoms are not tested for.

2.       How many cases are misdiagnosed? Is someone you know a possible victim?

3.       Who can you trust for help, advice, in handling a child with off the chart symptoms, including uncontrollable tantrums? What alternatives are available?  Neurofeedback, nutritional considerations, accupuncture, nutrients, supplements, exercise, cognitive therapy, art therapy, music, dance, creative expression, meditation.

MerrieWay advocates: We need a medical system that doesn’t medicate symptoms, but does a more responsible job in looking at underlying causes. Don’t squelch the creative child out of fear, overload, or pharmaceutical companies profiteering.

We have a drugged out nation regarding anti-depressants and psychotropic meds. Two-year-olds are being medicated with killer drugs, read the side effects. Gee, we don’t have to read, they tell us on TV we could get cancer, commit suicide or die. Liquor ads, cigarette ads have been banned from TV. But, drug use is promoted, making it ‘OK’. 

The psychotropic meds are addictive; just try to get off of Zyprexa, Prozac, or any other drug in these categories. Withdrawal mimics the symptoms that the drugs are supposed to alleviate. The mock Pharma drug tests,4 to 6 week period, are often marginally better than a placebo. Overtime, meds can have even less efficacy than a placebo.

These chemical lobotomies are Big Pharma Biz as usual. No one pays attention until this vicious cycle of no return to baseline wellness happens to their child, loved one, or friend. (we are not referring to those who have been helped, we are addressing the experimentation on youngsters, not knowing the long range effects on brain development, and neurological damage that takes place with these high powered meds.

Dumbed and numbed society – is there 2% left among us that are aware, care, or will stand up? MerrieWay is in for the long haul…come on and join us. Take a stand for our kids!

Please add to the discussion of remedy, solution ,and evolution for healing our children.

www.merrieway.com

 

Learning Curves

Learning Curves


 

Sometimes they’re steep, sometimes they’re not. Sometimes they’re pleasurable, sometimes they’re not. Learning curves.

We all encounter them. The issue isn’t that. The issue is how we respond to them. Personally, I feel that a day that goes by without learning something (anything) is a wasted day! Learning is as natural to me as breathing.

How about you?

Lots of folks fall into viscous resistance when it comes to learning new things. Lots. Why? There are myriad reasons. One is a history of difficulty in learning. In recent years, a lot of people have been diagnosed with learning disabilities. ADD. ADHD.

In my opinion, they’re often used as catch-all diagnoses for a more insidious subtext: we don’t know what’s wrong, but let’s medicate anyway. I know plenty of people on whom the drugs prescribed for these maladies don’t work. Why should that be?

Well, usually when I work with folks with these sorts of diagnoses, I discover that they have trouble paying attention. Difficulty in paying attention is usually caused by some sort of major distraction in a life.

An historical event that was traumatic …

A current experience that’s upsetting …

Fear of a future event ….

I think it’s better to consider learning “disabilities” as what they really are: teaching disabilities. I learned about this from the founders of NLP—neurolinguistic programming. Everyone has his or her own learning style, and it is incumbent upon all teachers to learn about their differences.

Some of us learn best visually.

Some of us learn best auditorily.

Some of us learn best kinesthetically.


Eyes, Ears, Sensations are other ways to say this.

Knowing your own learning style is crucial to enjoying learning. If you’re a kinesthetic, and learn things best by doing them, your IT person can explain it for days, but until you get to run the program yourself, it won’t mean anything.

So give it a thought, won’t you? What is your preferred learning style?

Once you know that, then your learning curves will change. Arrange to learn the hard things in your preferred style. Learn the simpler ones in a style that isn’t particularly natural to you.

The goal is to learn, and how you do that is up to you.

 

For spiritual nourishment visit Dr. Corso’s blog, Seeds for Sanctuary

July 4th – Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Choice

 

On this 4th of July holiday, I think about our many freedoms, some of which we take for granted. This year, I fear the possible loss of my freedom to choose and to speak far more than I fear terrorists, because with increasing frequency, people individual’s freedom to express their philosophies, methodologies and beliefs.
 
What is Freedom?
Merriam-Webster defines freedom as “the power to speak, think or act without externally imposed restraints.” When our forefathers wrote the Bill of Rights over 200 years ago, they guaranteed us various freedoms, some of which are now in jeopardy.
 
Freedom of Speech
It is no accident that Freedom of Speech is the first freedom in the First Amendment. The Constitution’s framers saw freedom of expression as the hallmark of a democratic society, according to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). 
 
Several years ago, a long-time supporter of alternative approaches to learning disabilities, invited me to present a workshop on Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities (NLD) at the Learning Disabilities Association (LDA) of California fall conference.  A paper I had written on NLD caught her attention. 
 
Following the distribution of the conference brochure, which listed a provocative title for my session, LDA-CA was hounded by emails protesting my presentation. Why? Because I questioned the diagnosis, and suggested that NLD might be mitigated by movement and vision therapies. Some incensed NLD advocates waged an Internet campaign demanding that I be stricken as a speaker.  
 
Suppose even one of those who protested my talk had bothered to contact me. Instead of throwing temper tantrums, we might have had the opportunity for dialogue. Even better, we each might have learned something! Near the same time, I cancelled a program on “Treating ADD without Drugs.” Why? Because someone learned that several years ago, quackbusters had suspended the medical license of our keynote speaker. She assumed him guilty as charged.
 
What this uninformed person did not learn was that the speaker had spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to recoup his license, so that he could help more patients. He is one of many fine physicians who have been harrassed for exercising their freedom of speech. Fortunately, these doctors care more about relationships with their patients than with their pharmaceutical reps.  
 
Izzy Kalman, a school psychologist, and expert on bullying, believes that much of the fighting in our schools and on our playgrounds is a result of the lack of freedom of speech. He says “freedom of speech” is just a slogan today.  Remember when kids called each other names, and “sticks and stones could break our bones, but names could never hurt us?” Today’s kids, prohibited from using “bad” words, must resort to stronger means to exercise their rights of expression.
 
Freedom of Choice
Freedom of religion is the law of the land, but other important choices are also at stake. Many parents demand that the freedom to choose a vaccination schedule tailored to their children’s needs should be their right in a democracy.
 
How many more innocent children have to become autistic or disabled before the medical community admits that mass vaccination is harming the health of future generations?
 
What You Can Do
• Whenever feeling pressured to make a forced choice, take time to think it over. You have this option in all medical situations. Once a physician makes a diagnosis, there are many treatments to consider. Learn about all of them.
Support those who advocate for the causes you believe in. As you consider making donations, give them to organizations that fight for your freedoms. Wear their t-shirts and be a mobile billboard.
Use the media to your advantage. Subscribe to magazines and newsletters that give you the latest information, not the status quo. If you view or read anything that you find disturbing, take time to write an e-mail or letter in protest.
• Walk the walk. Talk the talk. Be an advocate for freedoms of all kinds. Volunteer for good causes and be an example to your kids. Help them understand their heritage and what our forefathers fought so hard to win. Let’s not lose it now!
 
Happy Independence Day!
 

 

 

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