Tag Archives: ADHD

Mildly Medicated: ADD, Normalcy and Finding Acceptance in Music

Pay Attention!

If there were two words that I could have stricken from the English language growing up, it would have been those two. You would think that hearing them countless thousands of times you’d become desensitized, but you don’t, or at least I didn’t. People with ADD, which is very different from ADHD will know what I’m talking about. It has nothing to do with being smart or mental capacity, it’s just that your brain has its own set of commands and protocols that it intends to follow, and getting it to do something completely different and focusing just goes against the grain. In fact, it really wants to do something completely different most of the time, regardless of how much I want it to do what everyone else is doing. It’s not a question of desire; it’s a question of a biological constraint. The sooner you learn to work within that constraint, the easier things become.

There are a lot of very good people who I know I frustrated early on, my mother is one, and this woman has the patience of a saint. She was raising 3 boys on her own, and I’m sure I didn’t make the task any easier for her. My family, my teachers, all people who had the best intentions of trying to help me, sometimes made matters worse. I learn at my own pace. Sometimes that can be slower than normal, and sometimes faster. It depends on the protocol. Thankfully I was able to find a connection with music. Listening to it, understanding it on an intimate level, and being able to play it was somehow within my ADD brain wiring protocol. I must admit that in the beginning I was not very good, but I found out early that my condition seemed to exclude music while my brain usually bounced around from subject to subject, or topic to topic. I realized I was actually able to practice for very long periods of time and get things accomplished. Through music, I was able to be recognized as more normal, or should I say “more acceptable”. I dove into it with everything I had. I knew that in some way, it would be my salvation. Continue reading

Mildly Medicated: Musicians Find Hope and Possibility After Diagnosis

By Jenna Basile of Mildly Medicated

Jenna Basile is the Bassist of the Modern Rock Band Mildly Medicated. What do you get when you combine a lead singer with Hemophilia, a guitarist with ADD, a guitarist with diabetes, a bassist with Tourette’s, and a drummer on HGH therapy? You get the modern rock band Mildly Medicated. Against all possible odds, these uniquely talented young musicians from Monmouth County NJ found each other in 2012, all unaware that each of them had medical issues.  It was only until they were discussing possible band names that they all realized that they shared a commonality.

I’m going to start this story backwards.  I can assure you it ends well, and I have found peace, love, and acceptance. I have forged a family out of people who were once strangers, I have found my passion, my defining life force, my balance. The road to all this enlightenment and nirvana was not exactly an easy one to walk as there were many obstacles in my way and many forks where decisions had to be made. Let’s back uScreen Shot 2016-04-07 at 8.22.08 AMp a little a put ourselves about 4 years ago. I was a young female going through my really awkward stage. I wasn’t hideous, but I wasn’t the belle of the ball either. I did not hang with the “popular kids” and my father spent long hours as an investment banker in NYC, and sometimes left to live in foreign lands for weeks or months. I took solace in playing music. My older brother was already an accomplished drummer, and it looked like he was having fun, so I decide to follow him and began studying piano. After almost two years, I was pretty decent, although if I was honest with you I don’t think I was truly passionate about the instrument, but I did enjoy the accolades. One night while practicing, I noticed that I was unable to strike the keys with precision. As I continued, I realized that I was losing control of my body as a whole; the movements that were happening were not of my own design. I freaked out and had to be taken to the emergency room. I remember when the doctor walked in after I had taken a battery of tests. Just the look on his face told me that my world was about to change. Continue reading

Better Than Before: Why are Adult Women Using ADHD Meds?

ADHD pillsI read with great interest the other day a story on the rising use of ADHD medication among women. While the new mantra for women is that to succeed they need to “lean in,” to be more assertive and seek greater authority at work and at home, the added pressures to do it all may be driving them to use these prescriptions to help them attain that superwoman status. Consider, if you will, the competition out there. We all know that classic A-Type tornado — the woman who gets up at 5 a.m., sprints to the gym, then showers, answers all e-mails, fixes her family a breakfast of flaxseed banana waffles with hot maple syrup and is ready to go the office as soon as she drives her four equally perfect children to school.

I must confess that when my kids were little, I too, thought I could be the perfect woman. But that notion didn’t last very long. Indeed, I recall rushing my older sons off to the bus, taking my little girl to nursery school, and even giving The Lawyer a ride to his office. An hour later, all missions accomplished, I, Wonder Woman, űber wife, returned to my office and started to write my column still with plenty of time left to meet my deadline. I sat back in the chair and let out a large self-satisfied sigh, thinking to myself: Who said you can’t have it—and, most important, do it—all? Just then the phone rang.

“Mrs. Michael,” stated the voice on the other end, “this is Mrs. Butters at the nursery school.” Pause. “You seem to have sent your daughter to school in her pajamas.” Bam!

Until recently, the regular evening (and/or lunchtime) calmative of choice for professional women was almost always a glass (or two, or three) of white wine. But nowadays, more and more women are turning to prescription medication to help them focus and become more productive. While virtually all of us in the health advice arena recommend other modalities such as healthier diets, sound fitness programs and meditation, for example, a pill, alas, seems so much easier! In fact, according to a report just released by Express Scripts based  on an analysis of prescription claims that was the latest and most comprehensive look at ADHD medication trends in the U.S., adult women’s use of ADHD medications has risen so far and fast that it far outnumbers those taken by adult men.

The report also finds achievement demands may be impacting increasingly younger women. Surprisingly, the number of females ages 19-25 on these medications is 27 percent higher than girls ages 4-18, countering trends seen in males, whose ADHD medication use drops sharply after age 18. Furthermore, the greatest surge in ADHD use has been in the adult population – climbing 53 percent overall and an alarming 84 percent for those ages 26-34.

“The rapid increase in adult use of these medications is striking, especially since there is very little research on how these treatments affect an older population,” says David Muzina, M.D., Express Scripts’ Vice President of Specialist Practice. “It signals a need to look more closely at how and why physicians prescribe these medications for adults, particularly women, who may turn to them, or experience symptoms of attention disorders, as a result of keeping up with the multiple demands on their time.”

Other findings from the research include:

• The percentage of boys ages 12-18 using ADHD drugs reached 9 percent in 2012, a nearly 18 percent increase from 2008.

• The southern region of the U.S. has the highest concentration of ADHD medication use, with South Carolina showing the greatest prevalence overall: 14 percent of 12-18 year olds there are on an ADHD drug treatment program.

• The prescribing of anti-psychotic treatments is exceptionally high among those treated for ADHD (12 percent vs. 4 percent of non-ADHD medication users); however, the number has been declining in recent years.

Continues Dr. Muzina: “While ADHD medications can be extremely beneficial, they can still be dangerous for patients with heart problems, and may cause serious interactions with other prescriptions, as well as conditions such as bipolar disorder.“

That is why, according to the doctor, these types of drugs require judicious prescribing. To that end, patients with ADHD can benefit from the expertise and experience provided through Express Scripts’ Neuroscience Therapeutic Resource Center®, where specialist pharmacists with advanced training in behavioral treatments oversee their care. These experienced clinical specialists are very familiar with the complex medication-related issues associated with ADHD and its treatments, are well equipped to recognize medication issues and can effectively counsel patients on the proper use of these drugs.

With ADHD medication abuse a growing problem, specialist pharmacists are also on the lookout for any indications of potential abuse. If this is suspected, Express Scripts’ Fraud, Waste and Abuse program can investigate and, when necessary, will refer the matter to the proper legal authorities.

The net-net is that ADHD medications should be carefully prescribed and monitored. While so far it is mostly through anecdotal reporting, it seems as if there is a growing concern throughout the U.S. that these drugs are frequently being liberally administered without the proper testing. There certainly are plenty of credible defenders of this surge in growth of their use, but the Express Scripts Report is certainly sobering support for those who are alarmed by the recent upward trend. To access the full report, please visit http://lab.express-scripts.com/prescription-drug-trends/turning-attention-adhd/.

Meditative Reflections on an Unfocused Mind (Part 2)

Continued from Part 1, here are another 10 meditative reflections on an unfocused mind:

27.  Congratulations to you if you have an unfocused mind!

28.  I repeat: your “attention deficit” is an attention surplus.

29.  Indeed, by not getting stuck on one thing, you manage to track many things.

30.  A distractible mind is an agile mind.

31.  A mind that cannot be distracted is a non-reactive mind.  That’s an evolutionary minus.

32.  A mind that is easily distracted is a reactive mind. That’s an evolutionary plus.

33.  Recognize: mind is hopelessly one-track: mind is zero-sum: mind is “either/or.”

34.  Recognize: distractibility is mind’s attempt to keep track of more than one thing at a time.

35.  Recognize: distractibility is an openness to stimuli, an openness to context.

36.  That’s why I keep saying: “attention deficit” is actually “attention surplus.”

 

From “Attention Surplus: Rethinking ADD” (P.  Somov, 2012)

www.eatingthemoment.com

www.drsomov.com

photo by: h.koppdelaney

27 Meditative Reflections on an Unfocused Mind


27 meditative reflections on an unfocused mind:

1. A focused mind is a closed mind: to pay attention to one thing is to ignore another thing.

3. Mind is one-track: to pay attention to “this” is to ignore “that.”

4. Attention is zero-sum: to see one thing is to be blind to another thing.

5. That’s how attention works.  And that is normal.

6. To focus is to zoom in.

7. To zoom in is to notice the Small, the Specific, the Particular, the Detail.

8. To zoom in is to ignore the Big Picture, to lose sight of the rest of what exists.

9. Thus, to focus on the Small is to ignore the Large.

10.  Thus, to focus on one thing is to close your mind to the rest of what currently exists.

11.  To focus on a detail, on the specific is to ignore the Context.  And this can be dangerous!

12.  Realize: to pay too much attention to a banana is to ignore a jungle full of snakes.

13.  Understand: hyper-focus is an evolutionary risk.

14.  Realize: sustained attention is costly.

15.  Understand: a hyper-focused mind potentially puts its own body at risk.

16.  Thus, a focused mind is not just a closed mind but also an unsafe mind.

17.  We weren’t built to lose, we were built to survive.  This is true for you, me and all of us.

18.  Understand: your so-called “attention deficit” is not a deficit but an adaptation.

19.  Realize: your so-called “attention deficit” is not a problem but a solution.

20.  Understand: your so-called “attention deficit” is actually a surplus of attention.

21.  An unfocused mind is an open mind.

22.  An unfocused mind is a fluid mind.

23.  An unfocused mind doesn’t get stuck on one thing: it scans the Context.

24.  An unfocused mind is context-ready.

25.  An unfocused mind is open to anything and is thus ever-ready.

26.  An unfocused mind is an evolutionary asset, not an evolutionary liability.

27.  Congratulations to you if you have an unfocused mind!

 

This is an excerpt from my book Attention Surplus: Rethinking ADD, which includes 100 meditative thoughts that reframe the concept of ADD from a strength- and empowerment-based perspective.

www.eatingthemoment.com

www.drsomov.com

photo by: oddsock

This IS Me

Life used to be somewhat predictable, even if the ‘predictable’ was unpredictable. Let me explain. I have ADHD, had it all my life but only was diagnosed with it at age 32.  After I had come to know failure and almost constant frustration and being labeled as ‘different’ ‘ and feeling as though I was just slightly off, the odd man out, as intimately as I might my own face in the mirror.

Still, bad as it was at times, at least I knew, could count on the factors and therefore be somewhat comfortable with my life as I knew it. There is a certain security in an unvarying factor, be it good, bad, or fuggly. Despite it all, I managed to graduate high school, get an associates degree, support myself to the point of paying my bills. Another security, espcially in a world that was always chaotic  and nothing ever quite went the way it was planned.

I developed protective coloration early on, to better blend in with the crowd and had many coping mechanisms in play-I managed, if not ever achieving success to the level my parents had instilled in me, being the firstborn who ‘had such great potential’ and would do ‘wonderful things, if only she applied herself”, as after all, my parents had, and later, my 2 younger sisters did. So…I was the odd man out, even within the confines of my family.

I embraced this difference when I grew older, became the rebel, the one who made her own way and made her life the way shechose, not following conventional methods and the stepping stones of lifelike everyone else did. It worked for me. I answered to no one but myself came and went as I pleased and followed whatever whim might have smacked me on the nose that particular day.

Ah, but as I grew older still, I had a son and I went from that rebel, that woman who had life on her terms vanished and an abrupt 360 was executed. Those whims no longer seemed much worth pursuing and the very things that had built my character were carefully put away, as responsibility, care, caution and love moved in. That laughing girl was replaced by a quie careful woman who loves her son more than life itself and it was her parenting him and struggling with her own ADHD inconsistencies to be the very best parent she could be, by which she willingly even eagerly chose to define herself. That and her ability to be self supporting and dependant upon no one.

Along the way love happened again. Real love, the type I had not yet allowed myrself to experience, except in the role of that as of a parent, and life changed again, as my family of my son and myself grew to add a man. I had made it, in my own way of thinking, achieved what I had  wanted, viewed as important goals in my life. I was content, even if I hadn’t quite ‘made it’ as far as my parents would’ve liked, I was happy knowing I had what I did.  And life was good. Until the actions of a vengeful ex, my son’s father, took the one security in my life, my definition to and of  me- my self worth that I felt was irreplaceable. My one source of pride, aside from my son, that wasn’t dependant upon anyone or anything. My ability to be self supporting.  A job.

Without making a long story longer still, suffice it to say that despite playing by the rules as I had always faithfully done, as it applied to court orders on support, custody, etc-my ex played by no such rules and when I had the audacity to leave him, four years ago, fleeing his mental abuse and training that I was HIS possession, having to ask permission to leave the house and just lately, to re-open the court case, to take him back to court, make him answer for the things he had done to me, to my son, to my entire family, my ex found a tiny loophole in the child support I am ordered  to pay each month and ran with it. "I’ll ruin yo", was his parting shot. And it was well played.

Though I was able to prove what had been done was done maliciously, and an expungement was scheduled, the damage had been done. No company will hire a person with a felony, even if the person shows the papers of the judge determining malicious intent, the date of an expungement. No one will even care to look at these documents she thrusts so desperately in prospective employers faces, as she has already been deemed unworthy for employment.  The one thing I was always able to count on is no longer here and I know anxiety and absolute despair and utter humiliation every waking minute of my days.

3 months now, with no money and no job, no sense of purpose or worth. Constant resentment from the one man I truly love, ‘I took on this debt for you and you can’t even get a job?!’ is a phrase I hear every day and the worst part is that I can’t blame him. I know he still loves me but resentment over this situation that he didn’t ask for or bring on, that has been thrust upon him is quickly curdling that emotion. My relationship is quickly disintegrating, my ‘luxuries’ in life ( a beat up car and a cell phone in similar shape) are about to disappear and I’ve grown increasingly desperate. And guilty, for making another obligated to try to support me, my son, take on my half of the bills and work himself to death.  I’m ruining everything I ever wanted.

If there is such a thing as karma, it hasn’t found my ex, who has made good on his threat to make me regret finding the discrepancies in his taxes and re-opening this case. I have no more coping mechanisms and I’m finding, at the ripe old age of 37, how it feels to be brought to rock bottom. I simply don’t know where to turn.

I always had an inner light within me, for lack of a better term, a feeling that even when things were bad, it would all be okay. I don’t have that anymore and I’m just…lost. My wishes for better days to return have gone unanswered and each morning I wake, I dread what is to come, what awful ‘surprises’ are waiting to greet me. Creditor calls, the fear of a repo man lurking, another ‘retalitory act by this ex who is determined to see me suffer, another notification from Google advising my accounts have been hacked again (gee I wonder by who?!) the ‘subtle’ just inside the law and therefore unable to be held accountable for his actions problems, glitches, snafus and occurances that have been happening just recently and  the sense of humor that has always been my companion, in good times and bad is no longer here, I miss it. And I despair.

 

 

This IS Me

Life used to be somewhat predictable, even if the ‘predictable’ was unpredictable. Let me explain. I have ADHD, had it all my life but only was diagnosed with it at age 32.  After I had come to know failure and almost constant frustration and being labeled as ‘different’ ‘ and feeling as though I was just slightly off, the odd man out, as intimately as I might my own face in the mirror.

Still, bad as it was at times, at least I knew, could count on the factors and therefore be somewhat comfortable with my life as I knew it. There is a certain security in an unvarying factor, be it good, bad, or fuggly. Despite it all, I managed to graduate high school, get an associates degree, support myself to the point of paying my bills. Another security, espcially in a world that was always chaotic  and nothing ever quite went the way it was planned.

I developed protective coloration early on, to better blend in with the crowd and had many coping mechanisms in play-I managed, if not ever achieving success to the level my parents had instilled in me, being the firstborn who ‘had such great potential’ and would do ‘wonderful things, if only she applied herself”, as after all, my parents had, and later, my 2 younger sisters did. So…I was the odd man out, even within the confines of my family.

I embraced this difference when I grew older, became the rebel, the one who made her own way and made her life the way shechose, not following conventional methods and the stepping stones of lifelike everyone else did. It worked for me. I answered to no one but myself came and went as I pleased and followed whatever whim might have smacked me on the nose that particular day.

Ah, but as I grew older still, I had a son and I went from that rebel, that woman who had life on her terms vanished and an abrupt 360 was executed. Those whims no longer seemed much worth pursuing and the very things that had built my character were carefully put away, as responsibility, care, caution and love moved in. That laughing girl was replaced by a quie careful woman who loves her son more than life itself and it was her parenting him and struggling with her own ADHD inconsistencies to be the very best parent she could be, by which she willingly even eagerly chose to define herself. That and her ability to be self supporting and dependant upon no one.

Along the way love happened again. Real love, the type I had not yet allowed myrself to experience, except in the role of that as of a parent, and life changed again, as my family of my son and myself grew to add a man. I had made it, in my own way of thinking, achieved what I had  wanted, viewed as important goals in my life. I was content, even if I hadn’t quite ‘made it’ as far as my parents would’ve liked, I was happy knowing I had what I did.  And life was good. Until the actions of a vengeful ex, my son’s father, took the one security in my life, my definition to and of  me- my self worth that I felt was irreplaceable. My one source of pride, aside from my son, that wasn’t dependant upon anyone or anything. My ability to be self supporting.  A job.

Without making a long story longer still, suffice it to say that despite playing by the rules as I had always faithfully done, as it applied to court orders on support, custody, etc-my ex played by no such rules and when I had the audacity to leave him, four years ago, fleeing his mental abuse and training that I was HIS possession, having to ask permission to leave the house and just lately, to re-open the court case, to take him back to court, make him answer for the things he had done to me, to my son, to my entire family, my ex found a tiny loophole in the child support I am ordered  to pay each month and ran with it. "I’ll ruin yo", was his parting shot. And it was well played.

Though I was able to prove what had been done was done maliciously, and an expungement was scheduled, the damage had been done. No company will hire a person with a felony, even if the person shows the papers of the judge determining malicious intent, the date of an expungement. No one will even care to look at these documents she thrusts so desperately in prospective employers faces, as she has already been deemed unworthy for employment.  The one thing I was always able to count on is no longer here and I know anxiety and absolute despair and utter humiliation every waking minute of my days.

3 months now, with no money and no job, no sense of purpose or worth. Constant resentment from the one man I truly love, ‘I took on this debt for you and you can’t even get a job?!’ is a phrase I hear every day and the worst part is that I can’t blame him. I know he still loves me but resentment over this situation that he didn’t ask for or bring on, that has been thrust upon him is quickly curdling that emotion. My relationship is quickly disintegrating, my ‘luxuries’ in life ( a beat up car and a cell phone in similar shape) are about to disappear and I’ve grown increasingly desperate. And guilty, for making another obligated to try to support me, my son, take on my half of the bills and work himself to death.  I’m ruining everything I ever wanted.

If there is such a thing as karma, it hasn’t found my ex, who has made good on his threat to make me regret finding the discrepancies in his taxes and re-opening this case. I have no more coping mechanisms and I’m finding, at the ripe old age of 37, how it feels to be brought to rock bottom. I simply don’t know where to turn.

I always had an inner light within me, for lack of a better term, a feeling that even when things were bad, it would all be okay. I don’t have that anymore and I’m just…lost. My wishes for better days to return have gone unanswered and each morning I wake, I dread what is to come, what awful ‘surprises’ are waiting to greet me. Creditor calls, the fear of a repo man lurking, another ‘retalitory act by this ex who is determined to see me suffer, another notification from Google advising my accounts have been hacked again (gee I wonder by who?!) the ‘subtle’ just inside the law and therefore unable to be held accountable for his actions problems, glitches, snafus and occurances that have been happening just recently and  the sense of humor that has always been my companion, in good times and bad is no longer here, I miss it. And I despair.

 

 

A Bad Trait Could Be Your Signature Strength

Many of us have trouble listing our signature strengths, but can easily itemize the flaws. Along the way we force ourselves to fit the mold and become an artificial version of ourselves.  Even worse, the self-criticism accompanying these imperfections causes a free-floating uneasiness. Consequently, we overdo – deplete ourselves with busyness to atone or even take medication.

It’s time to rethink our so-called flaws. They might actually be our hidden strengths.  This is why I was so pleased to discover new research concerning one of the overmedicated maladies of our time, ADHD. It turns out that ADHD has an upside. Could we be engaging in self-sabotage by trying to suppress and silence the good side of ADHD?

In my book, Addicted to Stress, I advise my readers to adopt the attributes of a "healthy narcissist"– to embrace who they are in order to become who they aspire to be.  In this chapter I cite an example of someone with adult ADD who berates herself for being flighty. Here is how she is advised to reinterpret her perceived weakness: “I am a scanner. I’m good at so many things and am looking for what I really enjoy.”

A new study in the Journal of Personality and Individual Differences validates this concept. The latest research finds that adults with ADHD enjoy more creative achievement than those who don’t have the disorder. “For the same reason that ADHD might create problems, like distraction, it can also allow an openness to new ideas,” says Holly White, assistant professor of cognitive psychology at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida and co-author of the paper. “Not being completely focused on a task lets the mind make associations that might not have happened otherwise.”

The world needs sequential, clear and focused thinkers. However, the skill of brainstorming, generating new ideas for potential inventions, is just as vital.

Could this trait turn out to be your signature strength?
* Laziness – you ease on down the road while others rush through life. You are likely to invent easier and more efficient methods.
* Doodling – you are releasing your inner creativity. This transfers laterally to your more serious tasks.
* Procrastination – you percolate ideas instead of knee-jerk responses.
* Shyness – you are a good listener and more likely to think before you speak.
* Messiness – you are a creative, multi-faceted person with an associative mind. You find what you need amidst the chaos.
* Jealousy – you are ambitious and accomplish great things by emulating others.

 

Meditation Improves Children’s Attention

A new study published in the International Journal of Yoga found that when children are trained to practice meditation, their attention spans are significantly increased.

The researchers tested two yoga-based relaxation practices involving specific meditation and rest techniques with 208 school children (132 boys and 76 girls) between the ages of 13 and 16 years of age. Their attention spans were tested before and after practicing the two techniques: meditation and rest.

Both meditation and rest improved the childrens’ attentiveness significantly but meditation had the greatest impact on the attention scores, regardless of gender or age of the children.

The study shows that meditation training may be valuable in improving attention in all children, but may especially have a role in the treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly since there are no negative side-effects. 

Who’s Telling You Your Child Has ADHD? It’s More Than Likely Someone Unqualified.

Attention-deficit hyper-active disorder, described as "the co-existence of attentional problems and hyperactivity" with each behavior occurring sporadically. According to the National Institute, two to three percent of children (approximately 5 million) have ADHD, with most symptoms surfacing before the age of seven. Mostly boys are diagnosed, and 65% of children diagnosed have disciplinary problems.

But how many of those children diagnosed with ADHD actually have it?

It’s hard to say, especially considering most diagnoses are not even given by doctors but by school teachers and day care administrators. 

A recent CNN report says:

Many parents begin their struggles with treating their children’s ADHD… with a suggested diagnosis from a school or day care setting. That’s a problem, doctors say, when there could be many other factors contributing to a child’s behavior.

For a teacher to suggest that a child has ADHD is "inappropriate and dangerous," says Dr. Elizabeth Roberts, child psychiatrist in Murrieta, California. Depression, anxiety and abuse are all possibilities in a child’s life that could lead to attention problems, Roberts said. That means that many children are receiving medication for the wrong problem.

Roberts wants to say to all educators: "There are many, many diagnoses that cause these problems, including abuse and depression and anxiety. So please, withhold your judgment."

 

Teachers have a very active role in young students’ lives and have a completely different perspective on a child’s behavior than a parent does. Although a teacher can in fact be an important asset in determining whether your child has ADHD, they should never recommend medication for ADHD with children. First of all,  they aren’t medical professionals and secondly, only ten to twenty percent of children with ADHD actually need medication. Most of all, many of the problems in the clasroom that can be summed up to ADHD, are in fact just down right behavioral problems that stem from problems from the home and just general parenting.

Most kids diagnosed just simply learn different than other students and do not respond well to classroom settings. Many of them simply need a different homework setting, tutors or counseling for issues in the home. ADD and ADHD medicine are very serious drugs to put a child on and should not be done on the whim of anyone’s aside from a licensed professional, as they are derivatives of Meth, basically. 

For all parents who are concerned that their children have an attention disorder, or any disorder for that matter, should consult a physician before jumping to conclusions. ADHD, although now mainstream in the media and news, is not a term to just throw around or a condition that should be treated like the common cold. ADHD is a serious condition that should be diagnosed and treated by a doctor. 

Photo: CC Flickr//*clarity*

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