Tag Archives: Hair loss

5 Nutrient-Packed Foods for Healthy Hair

de5de856512394ea_shutterstock_96575575.previewMany of us assume that buying the best shampoos and conditioners will be enough to keep our hair looking healthy. These products do help to repair existing hair damage but don’t do much to promote new hair growth and cannot replace essential vitamins that we may be missing from our diet. There are certain essential vitamins and minerals that our hair relies upon, and a lack of these is often the source of many hair growth problems. Some simple changes to our diet can really make a big difference to the look of our hair.

Modern lifestyles can also have an impact – a busy lifestyle, lack of sleep, or even pregnancy can seriously make a difference in our hair health. Vitamin supplements have  been proven to help, but if you are looking for the most natural sources of these vitamins then here is a list of 5 food types foods that can help to provide those essential vitamins your hair needs.

Fish

Many sources site that salmon is the number 1 super food for healthy hair. This is because it contains a great combination of essential substances that our hair simply loves. Omega 3 oils help maintain a well hydrated scalp, and many believe this is essential to maintaining healthy hair growth. Oily fish such as herring, mackerel and sardines are rich in omega-3, and salmon is also rich in Vitamin D which is great for your hair follicles.

If you are someone who doesn’t like eating fish then certain vegetable sources can be a great way to get the omega-3 you need. Rapeseed, flaxseed, soya beans, walnuts, almond and even tofu are all good sources of Omega-3.

Vegetables with Beta-carotene

Beta carotene is present in many vegetables and provides us with a great source of Vitamin A. For many people who suffer from dandruff a simple addition of vitamin A to their diet can help solve the problem. Vitamin A helps to promote sebum oil which is our body’s natural conditioner for our scalp. It can also help with hair growth problems as it is said to assist with oxygenating our scalp. Sweet potatoes are known to be one of the best sources, and other vegetables such as carrots, spinach, and broccoli are also recommended.

Oysters

Oysters are also recommended to help fight scalp problems such as dandruff. A lack of zinc in your diet may even be the cause of hair loss, and oysters have a particularly high zinc content. Zinc helps promote the level of androgens in our body, and for some people a low level of androgens has been directly linked to hair loss. Crab, liver and beef are also good sources of zinc.

Eggs and other biotin rich foods

Our hair is essentially built using protein, a nutrient that has been associated with speeding up hair growth. Protein can be found in many types of foods, but eggs are one of the best sources. Another important mineral in eggs is biotin, and those who have a biotin deficiency may suffer from brittle hair. To prevent this, biotin has been proven to be effective from both foods and supplements if needed. Kidney beans and nuts such as almonds and even peanuts are also good sources of biotin.

Fruit and vegetables with Vitamin C

Vitamin C is great for both our hair and skin. Vitamin C helps keep our blood vessels oxygenated, which in turn keeps our hair follicles healthy. Super fruits such as blueberries have a very high level of Vitamin C, and strawberries and citrus fruits are also good sources. Many vegetables such as green beans, spinach and broccoli are good sources, and the old-fashioned rule of eating colorful vegetables can give you a good indication of a high vitamin C content, as well.

You may have identified that one of these essential sources of vitamins is missing from your diet, and that may well be the cause of a particular problem. If you are concerned and believe you may have a nutrient deficiency then simple tests at your doctors can identify what vitamins and minerals you may be lacking. This Women’s Hair PDF can also help you to diagnose any hair health problems you may have!

What I Had To Exclaim About Provillus

To work against the production of DHT and support hair replacement, the Provillus topical solution holds 2 FDA approved ingredients – called minoxidil and azelaic acid. Moreover, I believe Provillus is one of the only hair loss products on the market which includes BOTH of these ingredients.

If you are somebody who desires pure products over artificial therapies, then opting to buy Provillus is still a sound alternative. The capsules hold over ten natural herbs, vitamins and minerals which have shown to help invigorate hair growth.

Combat Hair Loss Naturally

Looking in the mirror became a difficult experience for Janet. It seemed like every day her forehead receded further and her already thinning hair became thinner. Feeling like everyone might be criticizing her appearance she became embarrassed to go out and worried what might be causing her hair loss.   Her husband Thomas had many of the same concerns. Only 42, he had noticeable baldness.
 
Janet and Thomas are not alone in their experiences. By age 40, two-thirds of Caucasian men are noticeably bald. While many people wrongly assume hair loss is a men’s disease, one in four women experiences some degree of unnatural hair loss in her lifetime. But being in good company may not ease your mind about the causes of hair loss and what you can do to slow it down or stop it altogether.
 
Hair loss of about 50 to 100 strands daily is normal. There can be many factors linked to accelerated hair loss, including: medications and chemotherapy, genetics, fad diets, chronic stress, hormonal imbalances, nutritional deficiencies, and poor scalp circulation.
 
Addressing Lifestyle-Related Hair Loss
Before panicking about your hair loss, talk to your pharmacist about the side-effects of any pharmaceutical drugs you may be taking. Many medications are linked with hair loss
           
If your hair loss started after a low calorie or low fat diet, you may wish to rethink your dieting strategy. Weight loss programs should not result in hair loss; instead, choose a healthier, nutritionally-sound approach.
           
Chronic stress or serious illness can be linked to hair loss. Make a serious effort to reduce stress in your life and incorporate stress-reduction techniques, such as yoga, deep breathing, or meditation, into your daily routine.
           
Hormonal Imbalances
After genetics, hormonal imbalances are a primary culprit in hair loss. Excessive production of the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) within the hair follicle appears to accelerate hair loss. DHT is driven by an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase, which is produced in the prostate, adrenal glands or scalp. Japanese researchers also link excessive sebum production in the scalp to high levels of 5-alpha reductase. Their research indicated that animal fat intake may increase sebum production. Reducing consumption of hydrogenated and saturated fats, along with refined sugar and flour, and processed foods may be helpful to reduce hair loss.
           
A study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine reported that saw palmetto (serenoa repens) may increase hair growth in men. Hair growth improved in men taking 400 mg of a standardized extract of saw palmetto and 100 mg of beta-sitosterol (from saw palmetto) daily. Historically, saw palmetto has been used by herbalists for hair loss in both men and women.
 
An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) can cause thinning hair. Adding sea vegetables like kelp, nori, dulse, kombu, and wakame, all of which are rich in iodine may be helpful to balance this condition. Avoid drinking tap water since it typically contains fluorine and chlorine, two chemicals that inhibit iodine absorption. You may also want to supplement with 100 mg or 1 mL of the herb bladderwrack (focus vesiculosus) daily. Medium-chain triglycerides found in coconut oil and coconut milk can help reset the thyroid gland as well. 
 
Many menopausal women often experience thicker hair with the use of natural progesterone to help balance hormones.
 
Nutritional Deficiencies
Be sure to eat varied, well-rounded, and regular meals that include plenty of vegetables, beans, nuts, fish, and lean poultry. Essential fatty acids from walnuts, flaxseeds, fish, and avocado are also important for healthy hair.
           
Biotin encourages hair and scalp health. Dietary sources of biotin include: nuts, brown rice, and oats. Iron is also essential for hair growth and can be found in blackstrap molasses, green leafy vegetables, leeks, cashews, dried fruits, figs, and berries. To help your body absorb iron, you’ll need vitamin C, which you can obtain from citrus fruits, strawberries, and red peppers.
           
Take a broad spectrum enzyme supplement with meals to assist digestion and absorption of nutrients.  A B-complex vitamin (50 mg, twice daily) can help reduce the effects of stress and contribute to healthy hair. Additional sublingual B12 may be needed to prevent hair loss. Take 200 to 400 mcg daily.
           
The minerals silica and zinc are also critical for hair growth. Take 500 mg of silica two times daily and 30 mg of zinc once daily.
 
Scalp Circulation
Rosemary essential oil has been traditionally used to increase circulation to the scalp. Add a few drops per dollop of shampoo or conditioner.
 
Michelle Schoffro Cook, DNM, DAc, CNC is a best-selling and six-time book author and doctor of natural medicine, whose works include: The Life Force Diet, The Ultimate pH Solution, and The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan. Learn more at: www.TheLifeForceDiet.com.