Tag Archives: julia child

10 Quotes For the Food Loving Soul in All of Us

Ahh, food. How do we love thee, let us count the ways. Food is the fuel of our existence, the centerpiece of our social behavior and can even be our best friend in times of trouble or need. We have a complicated relationship. Some of us are wary of you and some of us over indulge in the delight. We definitely have our hills and valleys, but at the end of the day food is a vital part of the human experience. Actually, it’s a vital part of the living experience in general. So we’re toasting to the good eats in this week’s quote post. We rounded up a few of our favorites – some of them inspiring, some of them make us laugh, all of them are the truth. So grab a fork, dig in, and share if you too are a foodie.

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A Happiness Lesson from Claire Danes

danesThe September 30, 2013 issue of the New Yorker had an interesting piece, John Lahr’s “Varieties of Disturbance” about actor Claire Danes.

Though I’ve never watched My So-Called Life (yes, I know this is unacceptable, and it’s on my to-do list), I do love Homeland, so I was interested to read the profile.

Danes was quoted saying something that really caught my attention”

“One of the lessons of her adulthood, Danes has said, was ‘that there is real honor in being a total goofball.’”

This struck me, because I’ve really worked hard, myself, to embrace my inner goofball. Not to worry about seeming dignified, or sophisticated, or knowledgeable, but to Be Gretchen.

In this respect, one of my patron saints is Julia Child, and of all the posts I’ve ever written, one of my favorites is my encomium to her. She was goofy yet masterly, light-hearted yet authoritative.

Enthusiasm is a form of social courage.

Realizing this was part of my embrace of my love for children’s literature. And therefore it’s especially appropriate for me to quote, in this context, a great master of children’s literature.  In his brilliant essay, On Three Ways of Writing for Children, C. S. Lewis wrote:

When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

Yes, there is real honor in being a total goofball.

Agree, disagree? In what way do you allow yourself to be a total goofball?

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Blatant self-promotion: You’ve probably been asking yourself, “Hey, should I read Happier at Home?” Of course you should! Here are some reasons why you should pick up a copy. For one thing, my sister the sage says it’s my best book.

Who Are Your Patron Saints? Here Are Mine

winston_churchillPeople often ask me, “Come on, what’s the key to happiness? If you had to pick one thing, what would you say?”

I think that question can be answered in several ways, depending on what framework you use.

But one answer would certainly be: self-knowledge. It’s the Fifth Splendid Truth: We can build a happy life only on the foundation of our own nature.

But it’s surprisingly hard to know yourself! So how can you sneak a glimpse into your own nature?

You can ask yourself: Whom do I envy? What do I lie about? The answers to these questions reveal the way in which your life doesn’t reflect your values.

You can ask yourself: What did I do for fun when I was ten years old? You’d probably enjoy as an adult a version of what you enjoyed as a ten-year-old.

You can ask yourself: What do I actually DO?

You can ask yourself: Who are my patron saints? (A “patron saint” is a saint who has a special connection to a person, place, profession, or activity, or in more casual terms, a person who serves as a particular leader or example.)

I have many patron saints, but here are six of them:

Benjamin Franklin: practical, curious, inventive.

St. Therese of Lisieux: showing great love through small, ordinary actions. St. Therese is also my spiritual master.

Samuel Johnson: wildly eccentric, with a deep understanding of human nature. This patron saint made it into the subtitle of Happier at Home!

Julia Child: goofy yet masterly; light-hearted yet authoritative. For some reason, she’s been on my mind lately.

Winston Churchill: indefatigable, indomitable. I wrote a biography of Churchill, Forty Ways To Look at Winston Churchill, so I have a special attachment to him.

Virginia Woolf: intensely attuned to the power of the passing moment.

When I look back on the pieces I’ve written about my patron saints, I see that they’re among my favorite posts.

How about you? Who are your patron saints, and why?

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