Tag Archives: natural health

5 Natural Remedies for Your Medicine Cabinet

powdered-ginger

If you consider yourself health conscious, you’re probably fed-up of using pharmaceutical medicines to ease every little ache, pain, or skin issue. In addition to all the chemical ingredients that make up conventional medicines (good luck trying to pronounce the names, let alone spell them), using lab created remedies leave you open to a plethora of unpleasant side effects. The most common, and dare I say “most pleasant” include nausea and vomiting, allergic reactions, drowsiness, and insomnia. It doesn’t end there, some of the strangest drug side effects include (brace yourself) inability to hold bowel movements, amnesia, vision changes, compulsive behavior, and birth defects. Seriously, that’s just not right.

Besides the possible side effects, most chemical-based medications only treat one symptom, so you’re stuck buying a ton of medicines and hoping they react OK together. Then they sit in your medicine cabinet for who knows how long and the next time you think about taking one they’ve already expired (has anyone else frantically researched drug shelf-lives at 2am?). All this adds up to a lot of wasted money, overflowing medicine cabinets full of chemicals, and the increased risk of side effects when you mix medicines together.

The great news (that we often forget about) is that Mother Nature has always had our back when it comes to combating many common health issues. While you might not be able to replace all your pharmaceutical meds right away, there are many easy, affordable, and all natural (really natural, not natural flavoring natural) remedies that can help you clean up your medicine cabinet. And the best part is that most natural remedies treat more than one ailment – so you’re not buying one remedy for every symptom (plus natural remedies often smell good, taste good, and are less expensive than the factory made medicines).

Lucky for us, there are many natural remedies available, but the following are my top 5 picks you need to know about:

1. Ginger

Ginger is a natural remedy powerhouse. This root plant boosts immunity, relieves nausea and motion sickness, has anti-inflammatory properties, increases metabolism which assists weight loss, aids in digestion, improves circulation, increases insulin sensitivity, and opens up the sinus passages. Ginger is available fresh, in powder, and pill form (such as Wakaya Perfection’s Ginger-Eze.) You can make a simple ginger paste to apply directly to your skin, take a daily pill (a homeopathic doctor prescribed this to me years ago to improve my circulation), or try some delicious ginger recipes (ginger tea and cookies perhaps?).

2. Bee Propolis

Propolis is a sticky resin used by bees to keep their hive together and protect it from outside dangers. Because of its function, bee propolis has strong anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties and is rich in flavonoids. Typically honey has trace amounts of bee propolis, but you can buy pure propolis as a liquid to ingest orally or directly put on your skin to treat minor cuts or sores. If you choose to take it orally (that’s how I always use it), it does have a strong taste so you might want to mix it with quality honey. I don’t travel without bee propolis and I always take it at the first sign of a cold.

3. Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is one of my favorite refreshing scents. Of course, it made the list because it’s a powerful sinus and chest decongestant, encourages breathing by opening up airways, and relieves achy and sore muscles. It’s easy to use and available fresh or as an essential oil. You can simply smell the oil, make a homemade vapor rub (minus the petroleum), massage the essential oil into your legs or sore areas, or add it to a hot bath. One of my favorite ways to enjoy eucalyptus is a drinking a fresh eucalyptus martini (I told you natural remedies could taste good too)!

4. Dilo Cream

If you haven’t heard of dilo cream, you’re not alone. Dilo cream is made from the oil of the dilo tree – called the tree of a thousand virtues – which only grows close to ocean water in the Pacific and tropical regions of Africa. Dilo cream is becoming a popular natural skin remedy because its magical ingredient, calophyllic acid, is only found in dilo oil. Calophyllic acid enhances your skin’s own repair system – this means better hydration, firmness, elasticity and less appearance of lines and wrinkles. It also soothes sunburns, rashes, insect bites, and various skin irritations.

5. Garlic

Garlic makes the list because it’s easily available worldwide, full of natural healing properties, and it’s really had my back the last couple of years. Garlic strengthens the immune system, fights colds and infections, treats hypothyroid conditions, combats bad cholesterol, provides a good dosage of B6 to create new cells and ward off mood swings, regulates blood sugar, and keeps mosquitoes away. Garlic is available in pills, powders, and fresh. It’s great to cook with and you can use it directly on your skin.

Have you tried these natural remedies before? What other ones do you swear by? I’d love to have a conversation in the comments below.

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mailing_dilo1To experience the benefits of this amazing plant, stock up on Wakaya Perfection’s 100% organic dilo cream to use in your skin care regime! Visit WakayaPerfection.com to order your dilo cream and explore the pure Wakaya Perfection Organic Ginger, too, with accompanying recipes like the Ginger Lime Creme Brulee or Mushroom-Stuffed Pork Chops!

Use the promo code THRIVE and receive 15% off your next purchase!

Your Seasonal Guide to Food as Medicine: September Produce

Apples on treeOver the past few weekends, my sister-in-law and her family have made over 20 gallons of cider from some of the pie apple trees that grow on the pasture of our family’s Iowa farmland. Nothing says autumn like apple cider! And so it is here…the end of summer. Luscious berries and delicate flowers are fading as hearty leaves and roots make their entrance into our farmers markets and recipes. Whether you are in Arizona or Maine, I’m sure you’re noticing the changes all around you.

However, because the expression of the seasons is not the same in every state, what’s “seasonal” in terms of produce can vary quite a bit. I recently came across this interactive map that allows you to choose your state and see what’s in season where you live. There are lots of tools like this out there, but this one happens to be especially easy to use.

For this month’s seasonal guide to food as medicine post, I’ve chosen to focus on some of the edible herbs that also act as common botanical medicines and then, of course, I must talk about the amazing properties of apples. If you’d like to start at the beginning of this series, you can find the first article here.

Horseradish – A hardy root that’s been cultivated for over 2000 years with long list of traditional uses for everything from acting as a blood cleanser to treating headaches. From a modern science perspective, compounds in this spicy root have shown benefit as an antibiotic. In a 2006 study, a constituent of horseradish was found to decrease symptoms from acute sinusitis, bronchitis, or urinary tract infections as effectively as standard antibiotic therapy. From my own personal experience, I also believe a nice-sized bite of this raw root does an excellent job of opening up congested sinus passages!

Lemon balm – This herb gets its common name due to its lemon scent although it’s not related to the citrus fruit itself. An edible plant, the leaves show promise as an anti-viral medicine, specifically indicated for the virus, Herpes simplex, as well as showing benefit for symptoms of anxiety. You can crush up the leaves to make a hot tea or find dried versions in capsule form at your local health food store.

Borage – This plant is native originally to Syria, although it has spread throughout the Middle East and Mediterranean and can be grown in many temperate climates. The leaves and beautiful lavender flowers may be eaten, but it’s the seeds that get the most attention in the natural medicine community. According to a retrospective review of more than 2,000 supplement and medication records for elderly Americans (60-99 years), borage oil supplements are one of the most popular herbal products among elderly women, likely due to their relatively high level of gamma-linolenic acid, an essential fatty acid linked to improvements in inflammatory conditions and menopausal symptoms.

Elderberry – This plant has an incredibly long and impressive history as a medicinal plant. Native Americans used elder for infections, coughs, and skin conditions. Ancient Egyptians even used elder flowers to improve complexion and heal burns. From a modern science perspective, elderberries show promise as an anti-viral medicine, decreasing viral load in the body as well as improving flu-like symptoms.

Apples – Last but not least, apples! We all know the famous apple saying relating to health, and it’s true that this little miracle from Mother Nature is packed with goodies like fiber and vitamin C. However, what I find especially exciting about apples are some of the amazing compounds, called phenolic phytochemicals, found primarily in the skin of the fruit that are currently undergoing scientific investigation. An emerging theory is that these phenolic compounds may protect against certain neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s by acting as an antioxidant in brain tissue.

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Can Adaptogens Help Us Reduce Stress – For Good?

If there were an herb believed to help reduce stress and increase our ability to adapt to new circumstances, would you try it? Couldn’t hurt, right?

In this episode of “Ask Deepak” on The Chopra Well, Deepak Chopra addresses questions about adaptogens, which are plants and herbs that may be able to modulate our response to stress and any discomfort caused by changes in the environment. He examines the history of these substances and some recent studies on particular adaptogens which he has been involved in. How can these substances be used to improve our response to stress?

Dr. Mark Hyman encourages the use of adaptogenic herbs to help reduce stress and calm the mind. Such herbs might include ginseng, Rhodiola rosea, Siberian ginseng, cordyceps, ashwagandha, and others that are nontoxic, nonspecific in action, and generally healthy and high in antioxidants.

Studies on the medical viability of adaptogens to reduce stress have been somewhat sparse but nonetheless promising.The more we learn about these plants and their healing potential, the closer we may get to finding real, long-lasting relief from stress and anxiety. And wouldn’t that be a treat!

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Weight Loss Tip: Eat Your Dinner for Breakfast

GirlEatingDinnerFor many years, I operated a private practice as a naturopathic doctor in Southern California, specializing in the treatment of digestive diseases and side-effects of cancer treatment. Although weight loss support was never a service that I proactively marketed, it was an all too common issue that I found myself needing to address with my patient population. Really, this wasn’t a surprise to me, given that close to 70% of all adults in this country are overweight or obese. Every doctor, no matter their specialization, can likely relate to my experience – given the epidemic of overweight and obesity in our country, the need to treat these diseases is fundamental to successfully addressing the vast majority of other symptoms and illnesses plaguing our society today.

The weight loss protocol that I created was conceptually quite simple and consisted of two basic recommendations:

  1. Decrease reliance on packaged and fast foods and increase consumption of whole foods
  2. Make breakfast the biggest meal of the day, lunch the next largest and dinner the smallest

I consciously avoided complicated rules and trends such as those found in diets like “The Zone” or “Atkins”.  My goal was to create a mental shift in my patients from seeing a diet as a temporary thing to do to lose weight to a life-long way of approaching food in a healthy manner. Personally, I don’t have the time or interest to count calories, weigh my meals or eat the same frozen dinners over and over. Perhaps it was my own irritation with these trendy plans that played the biggest role in the advice I ultimately shared with patients.

To get started, I would often suggest a patient make one simple change: eat their dinner for breakfast and their breakfast for dinner. So, if they typically ate a chicken breast, green salad and slice of bread with butter for dinner and a bowl of cereal for breakfast, they’d just switch them up, simple as that. Although the idea of eating chicken breast and salad for breakfast was often a bit of a mental struggle, it was about as easy a change as you could make…no modifications to your grocery shopping list, no new recipes, no calorie counting.

More times than not, when I would see them at their next appointment, they had lost weight…amazing but true. With the idea planted (and some nice weight loss results as motivator), I would then work with them to find more suitable meal ideas grounded in whole food ingredients that followed the same approach of eating the largest meal at breakfast and the smallest meal at dinner.

Last week when I came across a study recently published in the journal Obesity that followed this same approach I was incredibly excited. I was even more excited when I read the results of the study that found significant weight loss as well as other improvements in fasting glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels in the treatment group. How wonderful it was to see this approach studied and to see it demonstrate such positive and measurable results.

I have often joked that I discovered the next diet fad and have even come up with a few potential names, “The Dinner-Fast Diet”, “Eat Steak but Only at Breakfast Diet” or maybe, “The Upside Down Diet”. Too bad I don’t have a publishing deal…it seems like I really may be on to something!

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Deepak Chopra: Take a Journey Into Healing

The Chopra Center invites you to attend this rare opportunity to expand your understanding of mind-body healing, Ayurveda, and integrative health care. “Journey into Healing” features sessions with Chopra Center founder Deepak Chopra, M.D.; the Chopra Center’s expert integrative physicians and master educators; and world renowned guest speakers.

Each day of “Journey into Healing” combines daily sessions of experiential learning, interactive sessions, lectures, and group activities, offering unique opportunities to interact with like-minded individuals from around the world. In addition, Journey into Healing includes:

  • Instruction in Primordial Sound Meditation and daily group meditations
  • Morning and evening Seven Spiritual Laws of Yoga classes (all levels)
  • The science of Ayurveda and a mind-body perspective on health and disease
  • The role of emotions and the mind in health and well-being
  • CME credits for physicians and other health care practitioners

Learn how to enhance your health, balance, and well-being at Journey into Healing, August 22-25, 2013!

5 Ways Vitamins Can Help Improve Your Metabolism

I'm really trying here.Metabolism is the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of living organisms in the body. As humans age and fluctuate between weights, the metabolism tends to slow down. Adding vitamin supplements to any wellness regime can give a sluggish metabolism a boost. Weight loss goals are met easier with a fully functioning metabolism.

Here are five metabolism boosting vitamins to consider.

Choline: Burns Fat

Choline can reduce overall body fat by assisting in lipid metabolism. By increasing how fast the body is able to burn fat, you can become more efficient at losing pounds and keeping them off. Choline may even prevent memory loss in old age.

Many adults receive the recommended dosage of 425 mg through their diet or multivitamin, but it’s available as a supplement too. Choline can be found in fish (specifically salmon and Atlantic cod), eggs, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and wheat germ.

Vitamin B-12: Fights Fatigue

A Vitamin B-12 deficiency can make someone feel exhausted, weak, and even depressed. Avoid these symptoms and achieve a sudden boost in energy by adding vitamin B-12 to your diet. Vitamin B-12 complements other B vitamins, such as B-5, B-6, and biotin. The increased energy level from adding B-12 to your diet makes it easier to lose weight. Red blood cell formation can even be improved with this vitamin.

The recommended dose is 50 mg, and it can be found as a supplement and in meat, fish, and eggs.

Vitamin C: Metabolizes Fats

Vitamin C is commonly known to improve immune systems, but it plays a role in burning fats too. It can also help fight oxidative stress which causes weight gain. If you’re looking for medications and vitamins in the United States or Canada drugs, this over-the-counter vitamin is easily accessible.

Vitamin C is available as tablets, capsules, and drink powders, so it’s simple to add in the recommended 1000 mg to your diet. It can also be found in oranges, strawberries, cabbage, and broccoli.

Magnesium: Digests Enzymes

The National Institute of Health claims that Americans aren’t getting enough magnesium in their diet, so it’s important to consider adding this vitamin for the overall health benefits. This powerful vitamin helps the heart function properly, strengthens bones, and supports a healthy immune system. Magnesium can also help the body digest enzymes which naturally boosts metabolism.

The recommended dose is 500 mg per day, and it can also be found in whole grains, peas, and nuts.

CLA: Targets Abdominal Fat

CLA, also known as Conjugated Linoleic Acid, aids in metabolizing fat which boosts metabolism. Scientific studies have shown that this vitamin specifically targets abdominal fat. Other health benefits include muscle growth and decreased cholesterol. If you’re looking to drop pounds, talk to your physician about adding CLA into your weight loss plan. Combined with diet and exercise, CLA is a powerful tool to jump start your metabolism.

Take CLA with a meal; the recommended dose for optimal results is 1000 mg.

A balance of the right vitamins can increase metabolism and provide other long-lasting health benefits. While you can receive some of these key nutrients through your diet, it’s important to add in the correct supplements to have your metabolism work with and not against you.

Will “Obamacare” Improve Access to Preventative and Integrative Medicine?

The StethoscopeAlthough passed into law back in 2010, The Affordable Care Act (ACA), a significant government expansion and regulatory overhaul of the country’s healthcare system, commonly referred to as “Obamacare”, is beginning to gain media attention once again as the October 1st enrollment date approaches.

A significant number of people (40% of Americans) not only don’t understand this legislation, but cannot even confirm that it is, in fact, law. Although I am at least with it enough to know that it exists, I admit that the details of the ACA and what it will truly look like in practice is a source of confusion for me. If you want to try and make sense of the ACA for yourself, you can find information here, here and here.

As a health professional, I support the idea of accessible healthcare. As a naturopathic doctor, I also believe in the power of a preventative and integrative approach to medicine.  It’s with a belief in this approach that I am most interested to see how the complete roll-out of the ACA will ultimately make a mark on health, both financial and physical, in this country.

A specific clause of the ACA, Section 2706, is at the heart of both the preventative and integrative medicine debate. This clause requires that insurance companies “shall not discriminate” against any health provider with a state-recognized license. Again, coming from the perspective of a naturopathic doctor, this is a compelling statement. Although I’ve been licensed and recognized as a primary care physician in California since 2005, participating as a provider though major health insurance plans has not been an available option for me. Most plans cover traditional providers: MDs, DOs and perhaps RDs. This means that although I have valuable, largely preventative and low-cost treatments to offer, they are out of reach to most people. A $90, 30-minute visit is quite reasonable…unless you’re used to paying a $10 co-pay.

Given what I have been able to tease out of the research I’ve done on the ACA and Section 2706, it seems a more integrative approach to health options will largely be up to interpretation by each individual state. Hopefully, overtime, and assuming the ACA survives long enough to truly become successful, best practices will emerge and states will adopt a more consistent approach to the delivery of preventative and integrative services.

A recent piece in The Washington Post interviewed a leader within the naturopathic community, Dr. Jane Guiltinan, about her predictions and hopes for the future of healthcare in our country as a result of this piece of legislation. In the piece she quoted an often referred to belief in naturopathic care,

Health is more than the absence of disease.

If we really want to shift the status of health in our country, it seems a mental shift by insurance companies, state government and society at large may be required first.

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Confessions of a Former Vision Board Junkie

2011 Vision Board #1: Main Themes for the Year

By Sarah Anne Stewart

For a good portion of my life, I was a Vision Board junkie.

I wrote goals and affirmations, sketched pictures, snapped photos, and pasted dozens of magazine pictures onto huge, intricately color-coded collages. My “vision of the future” had to be precise, and represent all the things I was determined to attract. How else would I get from here to there, and attract everything I desired to experience in this journey of life?

Dozens of mainstream media writers and authors focus on this global phenomenon: the belief that thoughts become things, and only through thinking of what we want can we attract it into our lives. I agree but disagree. Let me explain:

On average, we think 70,000 thoughts a day. This in and of itself can pose some serious challenges. Unless you are the Dalai Lama, personally taking inventory of, managing, and controlling every thought is near impossible. Not to mention your subconscious, which is constantly active too.

That’s where meditation comes in. To manifest effortlessly, you actually have to STOP thinking.

Before learning meditation, I did seem to manifest things, but not effortlessly. There were bumps in the process and the results were less specific than I imagined. I manifested with huge delays in time, or after completely forgetting something tucked under dozens of other images at the back of my vision board.

About a year and a half ago, I learned–really learned–to stop thinking, and I now practice meditation every single day. Through my daily meditations, I have manifested things into my life faster and easier than ever before. I am sure you’re thinking, “Maybe you just had a lot of good karma that came your way?” But I truly believe it is much more than that.

Here’s why: For those precious minutes every day, you are free to have complete trust in the power of the Universe and what it can bring forth in your life. Meditation connects you to Source–the Universal power that we are all connected to. All those images you desire are no longer necessary for happiness. When we are connected to Source, we are experiencing all that was, is, and will be. You create a place of detachment from all earthly and material things. In this place there is no need.

Whether you feel gratitude or attachment, it will ultimately affect your ability to manifest. When you are attached to something, you fear its loss. As a result, you push it away. Meditation removes the fear, shifting you back to a place of love and gratitude.

It is extremely difficult to have gratitude for things we don’t yet have. Meditation gets us there without the obstacles of our own thought patterns. There is no battle with who-what-where-when-or-how it will happen. We are free of worries and fear-based thoughts. When we are in a feeling of “need” or “I have to have,” we are sending a vibration to the Universe, which responds with more “need.”  As your mind tries to determine how your desires will manifest, it also pushes them farther and farther away. You are sending a message that your desires do not exist, and from this place of lacking, you cannot attract what you want.

It is also much easier to have a still, quiet mind, than to have pure, positive thoughts every second. In this stillness we also experience satisfaction, gratitude, and appreciation without doing, thinking, or having anything. Meditation also offers a sense of peace with everything and everyone that opposes you so you can come into alignment with the solutions to your desires. And more importantly, all those images you desire are no longer necessary for happiness. From this place of gratitude you are now sending a vibration that everything you need already exists in your life. Out of this feeling of pure gratitude, our lives can be manifested.

The practice of meditation most importantly helps train the mind to be in the present moment, leaving no need to control our 70,000 thoughts a day. When you are in the present moment, your goals, dreams, and desires can manifest because you are no longer thinking about them. Instead, you are only thinking about what is in front of you at that very moment.

The essence of manifesting your desires through meditation can be summed up in a quote from the teachings of Ester Hick’s, “[w]hen you quiet your mind you stop thought; when you stop thought you stop resistance; when you stop resistance you are in a state of allowing.”  So yes, focus on what you want. Cut images out of magazines, then put them away, and let daily meditation connect and align you to Source to actually bring the things you want into your life. When your dreams become a reality, remember to bless everything you attract with gratitude.

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image-8Sarah is a Holistic health coach, writer, world traveler, free spirit, and lover of life. Founder of Introducing Wellness LLC, Sarah Anne passionately invites others to experience a new-found “love for life” and wellness through holistic healing. She enjoys writing about her down-to-earth honest life experiences and de-bunking conventional misconceptions about health and wellness. Her creative and unique outlook on life is structured around creating positive change.

photo by: marissabracke

The Best Way to Detox After Swimming in a Hotel Pool

keep cool on the swimming poolWhether you’re going on a quick getaway, a fun family vacation, a sightseeing adventure, or visiting family or friends, traveling can be both fun and therapeutic. If you’re staying at a hotel with a pool, it might seem as if the pool is calling your name. While lounging at the hotel pool can definitely be a form of mental detox (no meetings, no computer, no deadlines), it’s important to remember that your skin and hair aren’t feeling that same relaxation.

It’s essential that hotel pools are kept disinfected and clean; we’re all grateful to not share a stranger’s germs or be exposed to harmful bacteria. However, to keep water born bacteria and germs out, most hotel pools rely on chlorine (as well as monitoring PH levels, which affect the disinfecting power of chlorine). If this makes you think of household bleaching products known for “whitening your whites”, you’re on the right track. An active ingredient in both chlorine disinfectant for pools and bleach for household use is sodium hypochlorite. However, they are not interchangeable (they contain different amounts of sodium hypochlorite and pool chlorine contains calcium). While the Health Department regulates the amount of chlorine allowed for use in pools since it is a toxic chemical, many people still experience negative effects of the chlorine after only a short time in a swimming pool.

The most common effect of pool water is drying of the skin and hair. Since water itself is drying on your body (as it evaporates it takes with it your natural oils), when your skin and hair absorb the chlorinated pool water, your body hydration really takes a hit. You’re likely to notice itchy, dry skin and hard to comb, dull looking hair.

Some people also experience skin rashes, eye irritation, the lingering “pool smell”, and increased acne (although other people claim their acne clears up due to chlorine’s drying effect). Pool water can also get into your hair shaft and cause changes in hair color. This can be especially noticeable if you color your hair – think the greenish or brassy look. Nobody wants that! But if you’re like me and have a lot of hair coloring experience (I’ve been almost every shade in the book), you can probably relate to this one.

Now that you know the not so pleasant side effects of chlorinated pool water, you might be surprised to know that the best way to detox after swimming in a hotel pool is very simple: thoroughly rinse your whole body (skin and hair) immediately after getting out. This rinse washes away the chlorine that is stuck on your skin, eyes, ears, and hair so less gets absorbed by your body.

Have you noticed that some hotels have freestanding shower-heads by the pool or a changing room with a shower? It’s for you to rinse off both before and after swimming. If your hotel doesn’t have a shower by the pool, go directly to your room for a shower. Don’t make your shower steaming hot though, as too much steam can open your pores and let some chlorine into your body through your skin.

vitamin-cSome hotels are even utilizing Vitamin C showers to help wash away the chlorine on your body and remove any chlorine in the shower water. Delos Living, a new company that’s combining cutting edge discoveries in medical research, engineering, and technology to create a new standard of “wellness real estate,” recently partnered with MGM Grand Hotels in Las Vegas to offer a number of Stay Well rooms. These rooms have shower water infused with vitamin C to neutralize chlorine and promote healthy hair and skin, as well as a number of other amenities designed to promote personal health and wellness.

I experienced the dreaded hotel swimming pool effects first hand last week on vacation. The hotel I stayed at had a roof top pool with a bar (see how pools can call your name), so I had to check it out! While I only stayed in the pool for a short time and didn’t get my hair wet, I immediately noticed when I got out that my skin was dry and I had a bit of the pool smell. My hotel didn’t have a shower by the pool, but I quickly went to my room to rinse off and apply lotion.

Besides detoxing with a thorough rinse immediately after you swim, shower with a natural soap, be sure to put plenty of conditioner on your hair, use a moisturizing lotion on your body, consider showering or rinsing off before you swim (this creates a protective barrier from the chlorine), and always, always stay hydrated with good quality water.

Now that you know how easy it is to detox after swimming in a hotel pool, go enjoy that much needed (and deserved) vacation!

 

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18154748891333272199Are you ready for a healthy Vegas vacation?

The first of their kind in the world, Stay Well Rooms at the MGM Grand in Vegas are furnished with a number of amenities designed to maximize health, wellness, and relaxation. From dawn simulator alarm clocks, to state-of-the-art air and water purification systems, to aromatherapy, Stay Well rooms provide an unprecedented opportunity to have a healthy travel experience — even in Las Vegas. Designed by real-estate pioneer Delos Living, in conjunction with the Cleveland Clinic and Dr. Deepak Chopra, Stay Well will change the way you think about travel and hotel rooms. Learn more or book your reservation here.

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photo by: Julien Haler

Quinoa Salad Recipe (All The Way From Oz!)

As you may already know, I only recently discovered Quinoa.  It’s my new favorite health food!  Check out my Quinoa post here.

My awesome, Australian cousin (Victoria!), sent me this Quinoa recipe. I tried it and it is delicious so I wanted to share it with you!

Quinoa Salad Recipe

You need:

3 cups cooked quinoa
Quarter cup E.V. olive oil
Quarter cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 cloves garlic, crushed with a little sea salt
Three quarters cup crumbled feta cheese
Quarter cup toasted pine nuts
Quarter cup currants (I left this out as I don’t like currents :) )
Few basil leaves, torn
Quarter cup finely chopped flat leafed parsley
Tablespoon finely shredded mint
200 g cherry tomatoes, roasted
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper

To your health,

Kim Duess
You Be Healthy
You-Be-Healthy.com
Twitter.com/kimduess
Facebook.com/youbehealthy

PHOTO (cc): Flickr / SweetOnVeg

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