Tag Archives: paradigm shift

Can the Truth Come Back With a Capital “T”? (Part 4)

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Click here for Part 3!

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., Menas C. Kafatos, Ph.D., P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Neil Theise, MD

Working physicists, including some of the most eminent, believe that they are merely completing a very complex jigsaw puzzle, although most acknowledge that our theories are also incomplete and need more creativity. But that won’t really suffice: the universe will be radically incomplete if that big unexplained chunk – the mind – is left out, along with the vast array of inner experiences – love, joy, hope, sorrow – that comes with the mind. The subjective world is where our lives are actually lived. To exclude it in favor of only objective data gather through the senses, is like collecting every message ever sent over the telegraph without knowing Morse code. You will have a complete set of dots and dashes, but the meaning of the messages hasn’t even been touched. Likewise, our scientific theories are radically incomplete.

Especially among the younger generation of scientists, the questions left to answer aren’t just a mopping-up operation. Far from it. This next generation is more willing to confront the kind of incompleteness that potentially can alter the course of science itself. They are likely to not just continue doing the same things over and over again, just to remain in the comfort zone of “acceptable” science. This can happen once we begin viewing consciousness as a fundamental aspect of existence, not a byproduct.

Consciousness seems to be the simplest starting point for a science that could be complete. If consciousness is inseparable from existence, then so are the qualities of consciousness. The universe exhibited creativity, intelligence, evolution, and sentience, not because God breathed these qualities into Adam or because prehistoric hominids evolved in time from some far distant past to acquire them. In a very real sense, the universe has always been “thinking.” Mind didn’t begin with the arrival of the human brain or the brains of the most ancient species that roamed the earth. (The reason to favor the simplest explanation is that otherwise, if one ponders the question of origins of the mind, one gets into convoluted logical dead ends. We smile at the Medieval controversy over how many angels can dance on the head of a pin, because it so obviously defies logic and in fact it seems comic. Future generations will surely smile at our insistence that neurochemicals in the brain create thought.)

Humans have exhausted the old paradigm of science, in which data-collecting and mathematical formulas according to some fixed “laws of Nature” were privileged while everyday experience was too messy to contend with. The new paradigm can’t simply patch up the holes in the old one. It begins instead with a single game-changing premise: the most fundamental fact of existence is our awareness that we exist. Several of the greatest quantum pioneers, including Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Wolfgang Pauli, and Erwin Schrodinger, were astute enough to foretell the key role of consciousness. To them, it was never irrelevant. It was something science cannot detour around, to paraphrase Planck.

In some sense it’s a paradox that we award Nobel Prizes for eminent discoveries about the early phases of time, space, subatomic particles, weak interactions and “standard particle models” and so on, only to face the possibility that these are all mental constructs, for that is the implication of a fully developed consciousness theory. In place of the quantum field from which matter and energy arise, our spiritual traditions – through deep, persistent training of the mind to perceive the world in far greater detail and depth than is our habit – reveal a field of consciousness from which everything arises. The speck on the horizon is about to fill the whole sky.

The assumption by neuroscience that the brain creates the mind is seductive but has far less basis in actual proof. Yes, damage to specific brain circuits can cause people to not recognize faces or even go into a coma, but nevertheless no fMRI or PET scan or lesion study has answered the question of where in the brain does the mind reside. One informative example is a beautiful study from the University of Iowa of a patient named “R” who suffered damage to three brain regions – insular cortex, medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate – due to a viral encephalitis. These regions are critical for human self-awareness in modern neuroscience theory and patients with damage to these areas should essentially become zombies. Yet, despite memory deficits from the lesions, R remained self-aware. Likewise, the notion that the mind exists separate from the brain has no actual hard proof in the laboratory, though, for example, increasingly detailed documentation of near death experiences by clinicians such as Pim van Lommel, a cardiologist in the Netherlands, and Peter Fenwick, a neuropsychologist in the United Kingdom, strongly raise this possibility.

Yet, neuroscience has not revealed the “location” of the mind anywhere in the brain, or for that matter anywhere in the physical body of humans. Mind is simply assumed to be there, for no better reason than that the brain controls the central nervous system. This is like saying that music is located in a radio. There’s no doubt that radios transmit music. If you lived on a planet devoid of music and a radio fell from the sky blasting the 1812 Overture, you could claim that the radio is solely responsible for music. But that’s the very same kind of radical incompleteness that current day neuroscience suffers from. Having no other source for mind, they stick it into a physical object.

Everything we call real is created in our perception. There is no evidence that the world “out there” exists independently of what we perceive. (Even an arch physicalist like Hawking admits that science tells us nothing about reality itself.) The physical brain would have to exist outside space and time to “see” its own origins. Only consciousness qualifies as Point Zero, the origin of all experience. It doesn’t need time and space. It doesn’t need the laws that govern matter and energy. Consciousness, as opposed to pure awareness, only needs an object, that object can only be itself. In a word, to find out the truth about the universe and the life that flourishes on our plant, only an absolute – truth with a capital T – answers everything we want answered.

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Deepak Chopra, MD is the author of more than 70 books with twenty-one New York Times bestsellers, including co-author with Sanjiv Chopra, MD of Brotherhood: Dharma, Destiny, and The American Dream, and co-author with Rudolph Tanzi of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being (Harmony). Chopra serves as Founder of The Chopra Foundation and host of Sages and Scientists Symposium – August 16-18, 2013 at La Costa Resort and Spa.

Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Director of the Center of Excellence at Chapman University, co-author with Deepak Chopra of the forthcoming book, Who Made God and Other Cosmic Riddles. (Harmony)

P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, FRCP, Professor of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and a leading physician scientist in the area of mental health, cognitive neuroscience and mind-body medicine.

Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard University, and Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), co-author with Deepak Chopra of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being. (Harmony)

Neil Theise, MD, Professor, Pathology and Medicine, (Division of Digestive Diseases) and Director of the Liver and Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Beth Israel Medical Center — Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York.www.neiltheise.com

Can the Truth Come Back With a Capital “T”? (Part 3)

I miss you my master........Click here to read Part 2!

By Deepak Chopra, M.D., Menas C. Kafatos, Ph.D., P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Neil Theise, MD

If you propose that Truth with a capital T might return into our lives, like a speck on the horizon that gets bigger and bigger, many would prefer to swat the speck away. For one thing, Truth veers uncomfortably close to God. When Stephen Hawking was promoting his most recent book, The Grand Design, he held a press conference that created a headline shot around the world: “Science Makes God Unnecessary.” Hawking’s popular authority gave weight to a common sentiment. Even among scientists who are devoutly religious, nobody claims that God is necessary when it comes to doing science. (This assumes, as many religions do, that God is an external being, in essence an independent force outside the forces that physics study.)

But ruling out an independent, controlling Creator God-in-the-Sky doesn’t keep the speck on the horizon from steadily getting bigger. The speck is consciousness, which will become the basis of Truth with a capital T if human knowledge keeps unfolding as it has been. Science at its core is a mental activity, but scientists traditionally have shown a persistent aversion to discussing the mind, relegating the topic to philosophers and, most recently, to brain researchers, who claim that they are examining what appears to be the physical vessel of mind.

Physicists make theories about and measure external reality as such; for them, the “real” begins with the observable and quantifiable universe. Measurable physical quantities exist within space and time, into which are embedded all manner of things, such as elementary particles. They of course hold the view that physical universe won’t evaporate into clouds of fantasy or metaphysics. The constituents of the physical universe don’t depend on what you or I think. But, you might counter, isn’t thinking what consciousness is all about?

Not really.

There’s a sound reason for why the speck on the horizon showed up in the first place. The universe, like a comic-book superhero, needs an origins story. God once provided the best possible origins story, since an omniscient Creator in the sky could explain not just the beginning of the universe, but good and evil, life after death, reward and punishment, and why sex causes problems. For modern science, an origins story isn’t remotely so thorough. It is actually just one piece in a jigsaw puzzle. A host of other pieces are already in place, specifically the mathematics that explains electromagnetism and the strong and weak force – three of the four fundamental forces in nature, awaiting only gravity to complete the picture. As these calculations were being refined – a century’s worth of brilliant work – the origins story of the cosmos was jiggered to fit.

So far, consciousness still remains out of the picture of a physical universe, which most scientists are willing to consider. The evidence for the Big Bang (as a theory to how the universe began) is overwhelming, and even though we don’t have good evidence regarding the exact instant of the expansion, its beginning – currently held to be 13.7 billion years ago – set the cosmic clock ticking. There’s your origins story, an unimaginable explosion of space-time, in Einstein’s general relativity, that started the mighty expansion that created all matter and energy.

In any case, modern cosmology, a branch of physics, has been triumphant in telling the story of creation, so with a little patience researchers using billion-dollar machines will accumulate more data like the highly publicized proof of the Higgs boson, or “God particle,” hoping that, then, the picture will be complete. But this begs the question of what came before the Big Bang – a topic, like consciousness, that most scientists relegate to being inappropriate for study by others than philosophers. But shouldn’t scientists themselves be intensely curious to find out what happened before time and space began?

For some far-seeing thinkers, however, this is a “not so fast” moment. What does it mean to complete our picture of the universe? Are we simply missing a few pieces of a largely completed jigsaw puzzle? Have we reached the end of science where everything but a couple of nagging questions remain? Or have we actually failed to account for a vast and significant piece of the universe – consciousness – because the topic wasn’t placed on the scientific “to do” list? Perhaps their difficulty arises because consciousness and “what came before the Big Bang” might be related subjects.
Stay tuned for Part 4!

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Deepak Chopra, MD is the author of more than 70 books with twenty-one New York Times bestsellers, including co-author with Sanjiv Chopra, MD of Brotherhood: Dharma, Destiny, and The American Dream, and co-author with Rudolph Tanzi of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being (Harmony). Chopra serves as Founder of The Chopra Foundation and host of Sages and Scientists Symposium – August 16-18, 2013 at La Costa Resort and Spa.

Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Director of the Center of Excellence at Chapman University, co-author with Deepak Chopra of the forthcoming book, Who Made God and Other Cosmic Riddles. (Harmony)

P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, FRCP, Professor of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and a leading physician scientist in the area of mental health, cognitive neuroscience and mind-body medicine.

Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard University, and Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), co-author with Deepak Chopra of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being. (Harmony)

Neil Theise, MD, Professor, Pathology and Medicine, (Division of Digestive Diseases) and Director of the Liver and Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Beth Israel Medical Center — Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York.www.neiltheise.com

Can the Truth Come Back With a Capital “T”? (Part 1)

Screen Shot 2013-07-08 at 3.57.19 PMBy Deepak Chopra, M.D., Menas C. Kafatos, Ph.D., P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, and Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D.

In a sense, the modern world was created with a simple editing stroke when Truth lost its capital “T.” Instead of pursuing the Truth, along a hundred paths stemming from philosophy and religion, the rise of Newtonian science and the Age of Reason taught us to seek lower-case truth, which consists of a body of verifiable facts. We have inherited a suspicion about absolute Truth that can be heard in everyday speech. How often do people say, “Well, it’s all relative” and “There’s no such thing as truth with a capital ‘T’.” Between them, relativism and the mountain of empirical data assembled by science have suffocated the notion of Truth. Many truths have emerged, truth about the best form of government, about the value of free markets, etc.

The search for lower-case truth is no less ambitious than the search for God, the soul, higher consciousness, and a transcendent reality that lies beyond the physical world. Those were the basic elements of Truth as it was revered in the past but repudiated by science. We think it’s valuable to try and reconcile science and spirituality, but let’s skip over that for the moment. The truly important issue is to know if we should be going after truths or the Truth. It’s a question that touches everyone’s life personally, because in hidden ways our whole lives are governed by what we believe about truth. Is it just a mass of verifiable facts? Or are facts secondary to an overarching truth that people should live by as they once lived by faith in God an adherence to religious rules?

We’re not proposing the return of religion in its former guise, or making a back-door argument for a new kind of worship. (Ironically, many of the old religious views held that God is an external fact, as the universe is held to be external now.) When it had a capital “T”, truth defined the essence of reality. To say, “God created the world in seven days” was a foundation of reality, an absolute that was superior to everything else that might be observed in the physical world. This literal interpretation was of course contradicted by the findings of science. To a religionist, however, if a fossil dating back a hundred million years contradicted the Book of Genesis, faith required an argument that preserved the absolute Truth, no matter what the cost in rationality.

It hardly needs saying that science turned this scheme on its head, and now we know better than to accept any absolutes about the nature of reality. Not only have God, the soul, and higher worlds flown the coop, when science itself proposes to formulate laws of nature, such as gravity and the speed of light, these new absolutes are open to question. Time and space were absolutes in Newton’s classical physics until Einstein proposed his General Theory of Relativity. Now, at the cutting edge of cosmology research, the discovery that dark matter and dark energy may exist, and if so, they constitute 96% of the creation that emerged after the Big Bang, threatens to overturn the apple cart once again. It has raised doubts, for example, about the accepted truth that gravity dominates the universe and that energy only has positive values.

At first glance, the toppling of old verities seems merely technical. Ordinary life isn’t impacted by contending theories of quantum gravity and superstrings. Dark energy, if indeed it exists, is pulling the expanding universe apart at an accelerating rate, a startling finding that has profound consequences for how the cosmos might end, but who will be around billions of years from now when the end-point arrives? Anyway, quantum physics, which replaced Newtonian mechanics in the great quantum revolution of the early twentieth century, basically states that what the senses perceive is not reality itself, reinforcing the view that the Truth either doesn’t exist or is inaccessible. In a word, there is no place in a sea of constant change for anything absolute.

Despite the profoundly different world view that quantum mechanics ushered in, most scientists still practice science as conceived by the now outdated classical physics, believing resolutely that their task is to gather facts about fixed objects, akin to Newton’s falling apple or billiard balls bouncing off one another in a dance of cause and effect. This kind of science finds itself in a troubling place when it comes to explaining reality, however. New findings about the very early phases of the universe are already nibbling away at the edges of the three foundational principles that all of science is based on:

  1. There is an objective universe “out there,” external to observers.
  2. The universe reveals itself through the collecting of facts, measurements, and data.
  3. Once enough objective data has been assembled, we will understand the universe completely, which is the same as saying that we will understand reality.

These statements are the equivalent of holy writ for scientists; they are assumed without question to be valid, and as anyone can attest who has mounted an argument that doesn’t depend upon these principles, cries of heresy arise. It is strange that these cries of heresy seem to ignore quantum theory and its profoundly different world view. Rational researchers suddenly become hot-headed and ad hominem. One is quickly branded an enemy of science. When tempers cool, personal hostility turns into a more rational dismissal: To speak of a reality beyond the physical universe, one that isn’t known by collecting data, is simply “not science,” “metaphysics,” or even worse, “pseudoscience.”

In this series of posts we’d like to formulate a new picture of truth that replaces the flawed principles of science as it exists today. What is needed is an expanded science that grows out of facing – and correcting – some mistaken beliefs. Science follows wherever reality leads it. We think that reality has led to a place that isn’t explained by quantum mechanics alone. A new set of principles is needed to replace the current ones.

(To be continued.)

* * *

Deepak Chopra , MD is the author of more than 70 books with twenty-one New York Times bestsellers, including co-author with Sanjiv Chopra, MD of Brotherhood: Dharma, Destiny, and The American Dream, and co-author with Rudolph Tanzi of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being (Harmony). Chopra serves as Founder of The Chopra Foundation and host of Sages and Scientists Symposium – August 16-18, 2013 at La Costa Resort and Spa.

Menas Kafatos, Ph.D., Fletcher Jones Endowed Professor in Computational Physics, Director of the Center of Excellence at Chapman University, is co-author with Deepak Chopra of the forthcoming book, Who Made God and Other Cosmic Riddles. (Harmony)

P. Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS, FRCP, Professor of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and a leading physician scientist in the area of mental health, cognitive neuroscience and mind-body medicine.

Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard University, and Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), is co-author with Deepak Chopra of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being. (Harmony)

Deepak Chopra: A New Year, And Possibly a New World

It’s fascinating, as time turns another small corner, to think of how worlds shift and collide. There is no evidence that a person as brilliant as Shakespeare understood that Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo had already revolutionized the human mind.  The same thing may be happening now, and many brilliant people seem unaware of how our present-day world –meaning our conception of reality– may undergo a seismic shift.

 I’m not thinking of fossil fuels and Arab uprisings, not even of the 99% as against the 1%. Upheavals in the outer world are secondary, in the long sweep of history, to inner revolutions. We may be on the verge of such a one. What makes me think so is a trickle of medical articles, now greatly expanding, that are proving troublesome to mainstream medicine. These articles sometimes deal with cancer, sometimes with antidepressants, sometimes with the dashed hopes for gene therapies that seem constantly out of reach.

What these articles have in common is that treating the body like a machine isn’t panning out.  The next breakthrough in cancer or psychotherapy or genetically-related disorders may come from an entirely different angle than the workaday materialism that “of course” looks at our bodies as physical objects like any other. That “of course” is the mark of a settled worldview. A thousand years ago, God “of course” created the world in seven days and the soul “of course” was more important than the body, which was a temporary shell while the soul worked its way through this vale of tears.

When settled worldviews crumble, we have to reinvent the world. So far, there have been only three categories from which to construct reality from the ground up.

1. Dualism, which separates mind and body.

2. Non-dual materialism, which considers only physical things and excludes the spiritual, mystical, and supernatural.

3. Non-dual consciousness, which traces reality back to mind and beyond mind to the very potential for mind.

Dualism no longer satisfies professional thinkers. Putting mind in one box and the body in another settles no questions about either. We are left with half a loaf, unable to say anything reliable about pure mind but also unable to connect the subtle way that the body responds to thoughts and feelings. Yet curiously, the average person is a flaming, if secret, dualist. We compartmentalize our lives in countless ways. God belongs on Sunday, the material world dominates the rest of the week. We treat our bodies sensibly, yet when a mortal illness threatens, it’s time to pray.  This kind of compartmentalism is understandable, but in the long run it’s frustrating, as witness the countless people who feel anxious and empty in their search for higher meaning.

The same complaint could be aimed at non-dual materialism, but science, which is totally materialistic, has won a resounding victory on many fronts. Therefore, it’s an easy slide into believing that the scientific worldview must be correct.  Non-dual materialism leaves no room for anything that cannot be turned into data. So it is incompatible with God, spirit, the soul, and even the mind.  The average person has bought into the notion, publicized constantly by the media, that the mind is the brain.  After all, we can now watch the brain in real time as a person experiences love, faith, compassion, and all other “higher” experiences that once belonged to the mind and the soul.  But watching the brain at work is like watching an old tube radio light up when Beethoven is played. It would be naive to say that the radio composed Beethoven’s music. Yet just as naively non-dual materialists see no reason to look beyond the brain for an invisible thing labeled as mind.

This is the worldview that is crumbling while seeming to rise victoriously higher.  Termites are silently chewing at the timbers.  One notices this by being attuned to articles about the failures of the materialistic approach. Contrary to popular hopes, materialism cannot explain cancer or depression. It cannot tell you why talking to somebody can help your free-floating anxiety while tranquilizers may fail. Materialism sidesteps the mounting problem of side effects and the long-term damage to the brain from decades of taking psychotropic drugs. Materialism cannot explain what memory is, where it is stored on the cellular level, or why memories haunt us. There are many, many failures of this kind, and even in a field far removed from medicine like physics, peering into the void that gave rise to the physical universe has posed huge explanatory problems.

Which leaves the third worldview, non-dual consciousness, that is all but invisible on the scene. It has been invisible for a long time, certainly in the Judeo-Christian West, where only a handful of obscure names like Spinoza, Giordano Bruno, and Meister Eckhart flirted with the idea that all is one, and that “one” is consciousness.  Today, some farseeing speculative thinkers in physics are coping with the possibility that we live in a conscious universe. A tiny handful of neuroscientists are grappling with the possibility that the mind controls the brain and not vice versa. It’s exciting fun to be part of this splinter group, especially if you relish the scorn of experts who inform you that “of course” you are completely off your rocker, a charlatan, or a crypto religionist.

What the scorn masks is that “of course” will be thrown out the window if a new worldview takes hold. That’s what happened to the idea that “or course” God created the world according to Genesis.  But the non-dual consciousness that was dominant three thousand years ago in Vedic India cannot return as it once was formulated.  The modern world isn’t about to throw science out the window. Instead, science must expand, so that we look at cancer, depression, or the Big Bang and say, “Now I see.”  (In particular, the mind-body connection with cancer needs exploring, as we will do in a later post.) A worldview succeeds when it explains more than the old one, when it opens people’s eyes, and when it achieves practical results. In the next post, we’ll touch on how non-dual consciousness can do all those things.

(To be cont.)

www.deepakchopra.com

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 PHOTO (cc): Flickr / ViaMoi 

Answer from Israel

In the past weeks the Palestinian issue, criticism towards Israel and questions of right and wrong have been stirring again in the media and in our minds. In this confusing jungle of agendas and narratives, how do we know what’s true and how do we make sense of it all? I used to ponder these questions much until I realized that the answer was in finding a higher perspective from which to observe reality. As Albert Einstein once said, "No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it." And so the issue I would like to deal with here is not whether Israel was right in the way it handled that flotilla, or whether the flotilla was right to have sailed. I would like to take a step back from particular events and try to take a wider look at things, so that we don’t end up experiencing reality through just one point of view or narrative. Let’s take a moment to look at what we all have in common.

If we take a wider perspective of the world today, we can see that we are living in very special times. Mass media, transportation, internet, social networks and instant communication connect us in what is now more of a global village than ever. We wear clothes manufactured in India, drive cars from China, eat American fast food and watch foreign Television channels on satellite. Our economy is global, our ecology is global… our lives are global! Everything has become interconnected and inseparable. This also means that nothing happens anywhere that doesn’t have an effect on the rest of the world. It’s called "The Butterfly Effect". Now, when we consider this, we should also understand that the different crises that are occurring today are also occurring on a global scale: In the economy, the ecology, in education, in health and mental health (e.g. rising levels of depression), the rise of violence, family structure, marriage etc’…So what stands at the base of this, what is the key to the problem and the solution? What do these things have in common?

Though we must all find our own true answers, time is pressing and I will share with you the best answer I have found, which I hope you too will find fascinating and perhaps surprising. The key is in relationships, because that is what we are, a web of relationship in an ecosystem that finds itself out of harmony and experiencing crisis. In nature, it’s all about harmonious relationships and connections- from the atoms to the molecules to plants, animals and human beings. It’s written in science books about biology, about how our bodies function and it’s written in our deepest wisdoms and faiths. "Love thy Neighbor as Thyself" is not just a proverb or nice moral code; it’s a formula for balance with nature, and the secret to happiness! It is also the greatest rule in the Jewish tradition, and in the Bible, and perhaps when the world criticizes Israel so much, THIS is what it is subconsciously asking for- A real answer to our most fundamental problems, to our ability to relate to each other and to live in harmony with ourselves and with the world around us.

Israel provides the world with much technological, medical and scientific advancement; I believe it is time that it also remembers that it holds great psychological and Spiritual wisdom that is important for everyone to tap into. Understanding the greater picture and the new interconnected situation our world finds itself in, will enable us to begin to find better solutions to problems we are so tired of seeing get worse and worse. It’s time for a new approach; a smarter, higher and deeper approach that begins right at home, in Israel’s roots and in each and every person’s life. 

In this search for that which unites us, I think it is these fundamental questions of survival and of meaning that are most common to us allAfter all, we all want to have a secure and happy future. So what do you think is at the base of everything that goes on in the world today? What do you think we can do to start thinking globally?  It is time to start asking the right questions in a real way, because when we have all started to ponder this together, we will find ourselves much of the way to the solution.

 

Changing the Course of History: The Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations

While the challenges facing our world are tremendous, so too is the potential for peace. Though many consider war and acts of violence "inevitable," the truth is, dozens of nations have achieved a remarkable state of peace both with their neighbors and within their borders. The nations that have sustained peace can help the rest of the world learn how to do the same.

With this as the realization and goal, a coalition of thought-leaders and international organizations have come together to establish an unprecedented platform and new direction in the field of global peace-building forming the first-ever Alliance of Peaceful Nations.

On November 1, eighteen nations from around the world will gather in Washington, DC to be honored for their achievement of Peace. They will be studied as models for others to emulate and encouraged to provide leadership in the quest for peace at the inaugural Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations.

The Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations is an historic event that shifts the paradigm from a study of conflict and what is "not working" in our world to a panoptic, whole-systems approach to education, collaboration and peace-building at every level. Through innovative analyses and metrics such as the Global Peace Index, we take a bold step forward toward creating a culture of peace, recognizing that each one of us has an essential role to play.

The Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations will commence with a gala banquet at the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC on November 1st 2009. 18 most peaceful nations from nine global regions will be honored with commemorative plaques for their peacebuilding accomplishments and successes.

The evening will include an address by The Honourable Helen Clark, former Prime Minister of New Zealand and current Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme at 7 pm. President O´scar Arias of Costa Rica, one of the invited nations, will address the audience via video after dinner.

The banquet and symposium will be attended by dignitaries, ambassadors and business and non-profit leaders from around the world. We invite you to join with us in this unprecedented commitment to co-creating a culture of peace.

Kimberly King

Kimberly King, President
The Peace Company
The Peace Leadership Institute

Related Links:
www.peacefulnations.org
www.allianceforpeacebuilding.org
www.visionofhumanity.org
www.jwhfulbright.org

 

 

 

Changing the Course of History: The Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations

While the challenges facing our world are tremendous, so too is the potential for peace. Though many consider war and acts of violence "inevitable," the truth is, dozens of nations have achieved a remarkable state of peace both with their neighbors and within their borders. The nations that have sustained peace can help the rest of the world learn how to do the same.

With this as the realization and goal, a coalition of thought-leaders and international organizations have come together to establish an unprecedented platform and new direction in the field of global peace-building forming the first-ever Alliance of Peaceful Nations.

On November 1, eighteen nations from around the world will gather in Washington, DC to be honored for their achievement of Peace. They will be studied as models for others to emulate and encouraged to provide leadership in the quest for peace at the inaugural Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations.

The Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations is an historic event that shifts the paradigm from a study of conflict and what is "not working" in our world to a panoptic, whole-systems approach to education, collaboration and peace-building at every level. Through innovative analyses and metrics such as the Global Peace Index, we take a bold step forward toward creating a culture of peace, recognizing that each one of us has an essential role to play.

The Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations will commence with a gala banquet at the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC on November 1st 2009. 18 most peaceful nations from nine global regions will be honored with commemorative plaques for their peacebuilding accomplishments and successes.

The evening will include an address by The Honourable Helen Clark, former Prime Minister of New Zealand and current Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme at 7 pm. President O´scar Arias of Costa Rica, one of the invited nations, will address the audience via video after dinner.

The banquet and symposium will be attended by dignitaries, ambassadors and business and non-profit leaders from around the world. We invite you to join with us in this unprecedented commitment to co-creating a culture of peace.

Kimberly King

Kimberly King, President
The Peace Company
The Peace Leadership Institute

Related Links:
www.peacefulnations.org
www.allianceforpeacebuilding.org
www.visionofhumanity.org
www.jwhfulbright.org

 

 

 

Is Free Content Sustainable?

 

 
Tens of millions of people are taking advantage of free content. The proliferation of the digital universe is making advertising cheaper and providing a range of free information, products and services. Just this morning my inbox yielded offers for free articles, mobile applications, e-books, and a website promotion.

However, free content is not always heralded as a good thing. As has been widely reported many online publishers and journalists are questioning the merits of free content.

 
To keep reading go to The Green Market
 
 
 

Great Expectations: Man in the Mirror

In the name of abandoning all Expectations, I have snuggled, cuddled and found a euphoric nook with my Standards.

As I lie here, in the purest intimacy, I’ve never felt so content with the unknown variables that are my future. I realize that setting high standards for myself has nothing to do with my Expectations and everything to do with my Self Awareness.  We tend to believe that Standards and Expectations go hand in hand; yet, they are much like Oil and Water.

Let’s explore this for a moment. When the closest, dearest people to our hearts disappoint us, we tend to feel consumed with questions like "How could he do this?" "He couldn’t care about me?" "How can I call him a friend after this?" "How would he feel if I did the same to him? "After a tiresome effort of analyzing their actions, we begin to pass judgement on the person or have a person outside of the situation attempt to answer our questions.  Once we build up the courage, we may even confront the person we feel betrayed by.

Imagine this scenario if we were to allow our disappointments to renew our commitment to our Standards rather than impose our unrealistic Expectations on people that are merely Beautifully Human.  As with any commitment, there is an element of personal growth that can not be ignored.  Instead of buying into the misconception that you were failed by this person embrace the moment to welcome the idea that our level of success (in building healthy relationships) is directly proportionate to how many times we take the risk to fail.

 Failure is what you make it.  If we allow it to help us see beyond our selfish desires, we will be amazed at how our Standards begin to replace others’ Expectations as their Expectations are replaced by our Standards.

Join me in starting with the Man in the Mirror…..

As we share in the Great Exchange……

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