Tag Archives: Photos

The Beautiful Intents of Intent.com

In April we were excited to launch the brand new Intent.com app!
After building a family online, we were excited to take that family out into the world and allow you to share your intents as they happen. It has been wonderful to see the marriage of words and images, your feelings paired with that what you are seeing.

Some of those intent are… Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: 8 Major US Cities As Seen by Your Great-Grandparents

Here are some of the most iconic American cities, now bustling centers of commerce, entertainment, fashion, and media. They were important in these regards back in the day, too, but by the looks of these photos you’d never know it!

All of these images come from about the late 19th century, which you can tell by the horse-drawn carriages and old-fashioned clothing styles. We live in the 21st century, surrounded by all kinds of cultures and styles and immersed in contemporary issues and concerns. It’s important, though, to remember where we came from, and that we are part of a long line of individuals who have lived in, experienced, and help built this country we call home.

And what’s more, these photographs are just so darn precious. Take a look!

Boston – Newspaper Row, Washington StreetOld-Photos-of-Big-Cities-30

Philadelphia – Broad Street

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San Francisco – Bay Bridge

Soma1$bay-bridge-aerial-1935

New York – Grand Central Station and Hotel Manhattan

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Chicago – Wabash Avenue

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Detroit – Woodward Avenue

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Los Angeles – South Broadway

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Washington D.C. – Ninth Street

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And one bonus from New York… (Wall Street!)

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Images sourced: Fludit and Los Angeles Past

10 Stunning Photos of Ballet Dancers in the Strangest Settings

Dancers-Among-Us-Wellesley-College-Louise-Layman3237If you have ever seen a ballet performance, we’re guessing it was in a theater, on a stage, with sets, costumes, and the whole shebang.

It’s an exquisite art form, enjoyed by many as a luxury form of entertainment, much like the opera or a classical music concert. The perceived refinement of ballet dates back to Renaissance Europe, when it first developed as a social custom of the royal courts before being institutionalized by King Louis XIV of France.

Eager to emulate European culture, Russia became a powerhouse of ballet training in the early 20th century, with such masters as Anna Pavlova and Vaslav Nijinsky. Nowadays, ballet is practiced, performed, and enjoyed all around the world in countless ways, both traditional and experimental.

Case in point, photographer Jordan Matter recently did a series of photographs portraying ballet dancers in bizarre and uncommon settings. Ballet in the subway? Ballet in a meadow? Check it out!

Which photo is your favorite? Let us know in the comments section!

 

All photos by Jordan Matter

8 Incredible Photos of Burning Man’s Singular Landscape

A woman performs with fire at sunrise at the Temple of Whollyness

A week in the middle of the Nevada desert. No running water, no escape from the dust, no cell reception, no contact with the outside world. If these conditions excite your imagination and call to your soul, then all roads lead to one place: Burning Man.

This once-a-year-temporary-town, called Black Rock City, draws tens of thousands of people from all around the world seeking adventure, communion, transformation, and much more. Burning Man is essentially an art festival, if you allow “art” to encompass extravagant installations, fire shows, music, dancing, cooking, performance, yoga, and an everything-covered-in-LED-lights atmosphere. There’s the Temple, where people go for spiritual connection, write prayers and affirmations, and even get married. There’s Center Camp, the one place where people can exchange money for goods (coffee, tea, and lemonade.) And of course there’s the actual “burning man,” a massive effigy burned at the end of the week-long festival, a transcendent experience for all who witness it.

If you missed out on Burning Man this year, then not to worry! It’ll come back around next year, always the first week of September. Apart from actually attending, nothing can give a better sense of the festival than the incredible images captured by participants.

Here are 8 of the most moving photos we saw from the 2013 Burning Man:

 

Photo credit: Jim Urquhart/Reuters

Photo credit: Kevin Tang

The 8 Best Outfits From New York City’s Pride Parade

The Supreme Court announced their ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act just in time for two of the biggest Pride events in the country – San Francisco and New York City – both of which took place this past weekend. The NYC event was joined by Edith Windsor, the woman whose lawsuit brought DOMA under the Supreme Court’s gaze and ultimately won the rights of same-sex couples around the country to be officially recognized by the federal government. Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined the fun, as well, amidst rainbows, balloons, painted bodies, and colorful signs.

The month of June has been recognized as LGBT Pride Month since the late 1960s, particularly gaining traction in response to the Stonewall riots. These days Pride festivals take place around the world, both to commemorate the LGBT community’s long and ongoing struggle for equal rights and to celebrate the joy that comes from living in accord with our true, uninhibited selves. Politics aside, Pride parades are also perfect opportunities to see some of the most impressive costumes and decorations you’ll ever come across. Thanks to photographer Victor Jeffreys II, we discovered these eight phenomenal Pride outfits – and you’d be hard-pressed to find anything more elaborate!

The winners are:

Did you participate in any Pride events this year? Can you top these outfits?

 

All photos by Victor Jeffreys II

10 Stunning Photos to Celebrate Canada Day!

Happy Canada Day! Today is Canada’s national holiday marking the enactment of the British North America Act, which officially united the country. Towns throughout Canada, as well as communities of Canadian ex-pats around the globe, will be celebrating their country’s nationhood with parades, carnivals, fireworks, and more! Canada is known for producing some amazing things – from maple syrup to amazing hockey teams to Frank Gehry. What we love most, though, is the country’s majestic, unbridled beauty, as captured by these stunning photos. Enjoy!

Victoria, British Columbia
Victoria, British Columbia
Capital, British Columbia
Capital, British Columbia
Central Kootenay, British Columbia
Central Kootenay, British Columbia
Kananaskis Lake, Alberta
Kananaskis Lake, Alberta
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Lake Moraine, Alberta
Manitoba, Manitoba
Manitoba, Manitoba

 

Manitoba, Manitoba
Manitoba, Manitoba

 

Quetico, Ontario
Quetico, Ontario

 

Yukon Territory
Yukon Territory
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Yukon Territory

What do you love most about Canada? Will you be celebrating Canada Day?

5-Year-Old’s “Lemonade for Peace” Sale Gets a Slap in the Face From Westboro Baptist Church

Jayden is five years old, and she’s the merchant of a lemonade stand right across the street from the Westboro Baptist Church’s Kansas headquarters. That would be all well and good, except for the fact that this particular lemonade stand has a special mission. Jayden’s “Lemonade for Peace” is situated on the grounds of The Equality House, a rainbow-painted edifice run by the nonprofit, Planting Peace.

One might wonder how a child so young would know about, let alone comprehend, the complexities of this figurative and literal face off between the two organizations. Jayden does come from a special family – her father is Jon Sink, founder of FRESHCASSETTE/Creative Compassion, a multifaceted art, music, and humanitarian organization. When Jon explained to his daughter the WBC’s message of hate and exclusion, Jayden got the idea to start a project to raise money that would go toward spreading the opposite kind of message. Thus, “Pink Lemonade for Peace: $1 Suggested Donation” was born, and now over $1,000 have been donated to Jayden’s cause, both in person and online.

When you think about it, Jayden’s reaction to Westboro Baptist Church isn’t hard to understand. Children that young aren’t inclined toward meanness and discrimination, even if they quickly learn those things by modeling adults and media. In general, though, kids are inclined to be forgiving, accepting, and overall to promote accord and happiness. Why take sides when we could be friends? Why fight and sulk when we could play and explore?

As might be expected, the WBC responded to the Lemonade for Peace stand with almost enough venom to match Jayden’s love.

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But we all know which is the strongest of the two…

 

Photo credit: Megan Rogers

Daring Photographer Takes On the World of Mental Illness Behind Bars (Slideshow)

KSR - CPTUPhotographer Jenn Ackerman is nothing if not a boundary-pusher. Her work delicately treads the line between art and ethnography, offering glimpses into worlds that both trouble and intrigue us – from beauty pageants to dying inmates. Alongside her husband and creative partner, Tim Gruber, Ackerman captures the beauty and grace that can exist in even the harshest conditions, as demonstrated poignantly in her photo series “Trapped.” This project, inspired by a NY Times article on the growing population of inmates with mental illness, brings viewers into the stark world of someone trapped both physically and psychologically. It’s a place none of us would want to be, but one in which Ackerman immersed herself for the sake of shedding light on this little known side of the prison system. Ackerman writes:

My intention was to make that made the viewer feel what I felt when I was inside the prison. I took a more personal and emotional approach to this project than I ever have…I left the prison everyday wanting to help these men that have nowhere else to go. There were days that I was extremely scared and others that I left thinking how much someone on the outside missed them. Some days, I had to remind myself that many of these men had done heinous things. There were also days when I was reminded that some of these men have faded into the system with no hope of getting out…

For most of these men, they have been outcasts of society and rarely heard. So they had a chance to share their story and have someone listen that actually cared to listen not just focused on treatment or safety. My intention is to spark calls for reform for the treatment of the mentally ill and the prison system in the US.

On the project’s website you can watch the feature video, which includes a combination of action footage, still images, facts about the conditions of mentally ill inmates, and audio from an interview with the warden from the prison Ackerman photographed. The content is unsettling and at times hard to watch, but it is an important step toward shedding light on a community that might otherwise go faceless and nameless. Their stories, at least, will not remain trapped.

 

Photo credit: Jenn Ackerman

Occupy Gezi: Turkish Police Turn Violent on Peaceful Interfaith Protest (Inspiring Photos!)

v0sKEzcLast week, an interfaith, multicultural group in Istanbul, Turkey convened to protest Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s decision to demolish Gezi Park and convert it into a shopping mall. What began as a festive summer sit-in quickly turned violent when police forces arrived with guns, tear gas, and barricades. According to The New Yorker, at least twelve people have been hospitalized with head injuries, and according to one participant’s account, two people were killed in the scuffle.

The events in Gezi Park are startling and unnerving, especially given that this was a non-political, non-violent demonstration. Since when do police start handing out head injuries at picnics? Sure, this “picnic” had a specific purpose that went against what government authorities had in mind, but as one blogger wrote: “People went to the park with their blankets, books and children. They put their tents down and spent the night under the trees.” The #occupygezi and #occupyturkey hashtags that have sprung up on social media in last few days describe police setting fire to demonstrators’ tents and arresting hundreds of peaceful protesters. This conjures memories of violent confrontations during the US’s own Occupy demonstrations in 2011 and 2012, all of which speaks to the fundamental frailty of civil rights in these places.

Our spirits are with Occupy Gezi demonstrators around the world as they stand strong for civil and community rights:

 

Images sourced imgur.com and Occupy Gezi’s Facebook page.

10 Terrifying Photos of the Oklahoma City Tornado

A massive tornado ripped through Oklahoma City this afternoon leaving much damage and probably many injured in its wake. According to CNN, the tornado is estimated to have been nearly 2 miles wide, and more than 171,000 people may have been in its path, including at least one elementary school. Unfortunately the primary medical center in the area was also damaged and evacuated, which means that the injured will need to be transported to other nearby hospitals.

Today’s tornado isn’t even a stand-alone event, though. All weekend large swaths of Oklahoma were hit by devastating storms that left at least several people dead, 300 homes damaged or destroyed, and entire towns leveled. Hopefully the worst of the storm is over, though it is often the aftermath, as these shocking photographs suggest, that can be even more devastating.

Our hearts go out to all those affected by this tragic display of nature. Please use this space to leave your thoughts, stories, and prayers. Stay safe!

 

Photos sourced from Buzzfeed

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