Tag Archives: self-worth

7 Quotes to Inspire Self-Love

This week you’re going to see a lot of advertising geared towards finding your soulmate or getting the best gift for your significant other. It’s the holiday of love after all, right? But we believe love isn’t just about finding a partner – there are so many different types! Each day this week we’re going to showcase a different “type” of love. Today we want to focus on the love for yourself, because until you can look at yourself with pride and joy you really aren’t capable of truly loving someone or anything else. So go ahead and pick up one of those pink and red bags of chocolate, and keep it for you! You deserve it because you’re awesome. In case you forgot, here are a few great encouraging quotes to help you get in the self-love mood!

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What are your favorite empowering quotes? Share them with us in the comments below! Let the self-love begin! 

Is Jealousy Preventing You From Getting What You Want? (Part 1)

danes-300x300I’ve written many past articles about how emotions and thought patterns are associated with different energy frequencies.  For instance, strong emotions like hate, anger, and disempowerment, are associated with lower energies (scientists can now actually measure energy frequencies associated with brain activity and emotions).  We also know from the basic principles of law of attraction that like energy vibrations attract each other.

What this basically means is that if you think hateful thoughts, you are more likely to attract people, circumstances, and events that are a vibrational match to those thoughts.  Sometimes, this is easily apparent- like when you see a really angry person that turns off everyone around them- they just seem to have a negative vibe.

But most of us don’t have just one strong frequency or emotion going.  We think millions of different thoughts daily, and all of those thoughts have their own unique frequency associated with them.  Most people also vary in their emotional set point from day to day, and therefore tend to get mixed results in terms of what they are manifesting.

More subtle emotions that we don’t always outwardly show, like those of jealousy or envy, for example, also have detrimental effects on our energy that may not be as obvious.  So how exactly can an emotion like jealousy (wanting someone’s attention) or envy (wanting what someone else has) sabotage our energy and dampen our manifestation efforts?

Jealousy has a boomerang effect. A jealous thought about someone does little to the person you’re thinking about.  To the contrary, the thought simply bounces off that person, and comes back to you.  Let’s say you’re thinking about how someone you know has more money than you, and perhaps you believe that they don’t really deserve it because you work a lot harder than them.  The Universe then reflects that thought back to you and simply reinforces your core belief, which in this case, is something along the lines of “there is injustice in the world, and people are succeeding unfairly.”  It doesn’t matter if the thought is actually true.  If it reinforces a negative core belief you hold, it is ultimately detrimental to your manifestation efforts.

Jealousy amplifies insecurity. Feeling jealous about the lack of another’s affection or attention towards you, for example, has an underlying root cause of insecurity.  Let’s say you are insecure about some aspect of yourself (your looks, your inability to attract or keep a partner, others’ perception of you, etc).  Although you may not be consciously thinking about it, you are activating and holding a chronic underlying vibration of insecurity.  This underlying insecurity often manifests as the emotion of jealousy towards a partner or another person.  The partner then senses the insecurity, and causes the negative energy frequency to expand in both your lives.   When you feel jealous, therefore, it works best to take your attention away from the object of the jealousy and point the finger back at yourself.  As you clean up your own vibration of insecurity and doubt, the object of the jealousy often becomes a non-issue.

Jealousy signals a lack of self worth. We only usually covet what someone else has when we don’t feel worthy or capable of receiving it ourselves.  People who feel confident in their ability to live their dreams and manifest their desires rarely feel jealous of others, regardless of how successful or happy another is.  When we get frustrated about our hard work and efforts not panning out, or see success coming easily to someone else, it makes us doubt our own worthiness.  This sets up a vicious cycle where a feeling of envy or jealousy (even though it’s a negative thought about someone else) just makes us feel worse about our self, not better.

In next week’s article, I’ll be providing some practical tips about how to erase jealousy and envy in our lives through proven ways to increase emotions like confidence, worthiness, security, and self-love.

Cook Your Way to Total Self Love

Pink Summer Cherry LoveMost of our fears and inner conflicts arise from a lack of self love. The first thing I tackle with clients is identifying and eradicating the root causes of self-beat, shame, guilt and insecurity. I call it “radical acceptance”.

Ironically, one of the best ways to build self-esteem, confidence and a deep, inner sense of contentment and acceptance is incredibly simple and easy to overlook.

Cooking for yourself and practicing conscious eating are perhaps the most primal and important acts of self love. We build a deep sense of trust in ourselves and the world (and relieve stress) when we take time to nurture ourselves by making our own food, sitting down, practicing gratitude and enjoying it mindfully.

You can begin to improve your relationship with food and your physical body by enjoying healthy meals that have been prepared for you, but investing time and energy to plan and prepare your own meals allows for the opportunity to reap the benefits of the loving energy you put in.

A potent message of worth and value seeps into the unconscious mind when we nurture ourselves. Food and shelter are our most primitive, basic acts of survival. When you practice self-care by maintaining a clean (sattvic), safe, inviting home and cook for yourself, you send a powerful message to your psyche that you are worthy and important.

Love is an action verb. How do you love yourself? What do you do to show love? Actions speak louder than words. Affirmations are great…but how are you showing up for yourself on a daily, consistent basis.

Self love through food is connected to the root chakra, or first chakra, which governs the first stage of emotional and psychological development. The root chakra (mulhadhara) is connected to physical identity, physical body, grounding, our relationship to the mother and sense of feeling safe and secure in the world.

Eating disorders, food addictions or obsessive control over diet, the body and food often result from a child growing up in an unsafe environment (abuse, war zone, constant fighting, financial distress, physical illness) or having an insecure attachment to the mother (mother was depressed, alcoholic/addict, working all the time, emotionally unavailable or unsafe). Our unconscious tries to overcompensate, insulate or create an external sense of safety or control through our food choices and physical body.

Always eating out, rushing through or skipping meals, watching TV during meals or choosing unhealthy foods sends a message that you are not worth the time and effort to slow down, nourish, nurture and listen to your body and your deepest needs.

Focusing on your relationship with food builds a sense of safety, trust and connectedness. Your arms and hands are a horizontal extension of your heart center (chakra). When you prepare a meal for yourself, you literally infuse loving energy from your heart into the food you eat. Ayurvedic master Bri Maya Tiwari recommends massaging your food with your bare hands as much as possible and focusing on positive thoughts while you cook. Send loving thoughts, pray, chant or play pleasant music while you cook. These vibrations all end up on your plate, in your belly and healing your mind and heart.

Nourishing yourself by preparing your own food and eating consciously can lead to big shifts internally and externally. Start by making a couple of meals for yourself each week. Take time to eat each meal in a ritual space (clean environment, at a table, sitting down) and mindfully savor each bite. Celebrate quality time with family, friends or yourself.

Lovingly preparing food and cooking for yourself will increase feelings of self-worth, inner security, grounding and be a ritual to receive the love you give yourself – the most important love in the world.

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Ashley will be leading a retreat to Galapagos Islands in July 2013 and works with clients worldwide via SKYPE. Ashley is a member of Young Living Essential Oils, so if you’d like to sign up using her as a sponsor or want more info on oils, click here.

When More is Never Enough: My Triumph Over Addiction

200559715-002Food, work, the internet, caffeine, booze, exercise, shopping, lovers… many of us grapple with addiction in some way. Many commonly ascribe genetics to addiction, but it’s actually a complex spiritual condition stemming from unresolved emotional pain. Regardless of whether it is pain originating in childhood, or another lifetime, unresolved pain shows up on the physical plane as a voracious appetite for more. To constantly need something outside of ourselves to be OK is a very legitimate state of dis-ease.

Addiction comes in many shades, and while I (maybe) didn’t look like a person who was suffering from addiction, I, too, used to be trapped in the insatiable cycle of more – that never seemed to be enough. I was young and fit, but it wasn’t enough. I had a good job and a boyfriend, but it wasn’t enough. I had a closet full of designer clothes and a home on the beach, but it wasn’t enough. I didn’t know what was missing exactly, but I still felt like I needed something more, and then I’d be happy.

The belief that more money, more work, more accolades, more food, more alcohol, more clothes, more concerts, more lovers – whatever it may be – will make us whole/better/happier is an indicator that we are in emotional pain. With this corrupted thinking, we believe we are not enough just as we are, making it very difficult to value ourselves. If we can’t value ourselves, it makes it very difficult to value anything thing else we create.

On the spiritual plane, when we’re in emotional pain, we go “out-of-body” as spirit. You may be familiar with going out-of-body from instances when you are driving and suddenly you realize you have no memory of the road you’ve traveled down for the past twenty minutes. Where did you go? If you weren’t there, who was driving the car?

Every spirit creating through physical form is innately a trans-dimensional creator, meaning we go in and out-of-body many times throughout our day. What people call “spacing out” is more accurately understood as “going out” of our physical form. When we are struggling with emotional pain, we go out-of-body more frequently because we are living in a pain body and it doesn’t feel comfortable to be in-body. What’s more, we go out-of-body to a greater degree when we ingest drugs or alcohol. You may recognize how people you know seem to have different personalities (alter egos) when they’ve ingested drugs or alcohol. This is because going out-of-body leaves our bodies open to a number of spirits who then direct through us. Just as if you were to leave your house with the door wide open, lights on, and the music blasting, some people might take up residence in your home and party down while you’re gone- the same goes for your physical form.

In other words, the sensation of lacking control, otherwise known as addiction, is a result of literally not being in-body enough to maintain ownership of your body; therefore multiple spirits direct through you, making it feel like you have an insatiable appetite for more. These spiritual dynamics – compounded with the inability to value ourselves – prompts us to feel like we need even more, sending the cycle of compulsion spinning round ‘n round and making it nearly impossible to sit still and even enjoy the present moment. As we heal old emotional pain, and cultivate our own personal self worth, it becomes easier to be in-body and present in our lives a greater percentage of the time.

Despite the our society’s vague promise that net worth equates to self worth, I discovered that the real seeds to self worth – and ultimately a much happier life – are Dollars funnel.authenticity, vulnerability and integrity. Probably much to my parents’ dismay, these weren’t attributes I emerged with from childhood. I was pretending on the pretending and I didn’t even know I was pretending. Most people don’t. They just know they want more.

So how does one go about cultivating authenticity, vulnerability and integrity?

Authenticity means being true to yourself. Not going with the crowd just because that’s the easiest way to win approval and acceptance. Taking time to truly find what lights you up inside, and not just doing what you think is expected of you from your parents, teachers, and friends. It means making hard and sometimes unpopular choices, but if you find the courage deep inside of you to do so, you’ll find the authenticity, and power, you never knew you didn’t have.

Vulnerability means expressing the full rainbow of emotions we human beings are capable of feeling, rather than just portraying a picture perfect veneer. Only when we are truly honest with others about who we really are, and what we’re experiencing, can we share a genuine heart connection. If you are being validated for an image of perfection you portray, your performance is being validated, not your authentic self; therefore, you don’t feel seen or loved.

One of the most effective ways I’ve found to get comfortable being vulnerable is to create art of any form. Art is effective in drawing out our vulnerabilities because in order to access our creativity, we must suspend our judgment, and let go of fears of what other people might say or think of us. In creating (paintings, music, writing, acting, dance) you are removing the mask you may not even know you hide behind. The more I did this, the more comfortable I got feeling exposed, and discovered in the midst of creative passion, the tell-tale signs of being in body – hot hands and feet, heightened concentration, and unabashed enthusiasm – appeared and I found myself relishing the elusive, present moment. In the throws of inspiration, there was no place I’d rather be, and the last thing I needed was more.

Integrity is being honest with yourself and others. It means telling the truth, and following through with what you’ve committed to do. Integrity is the willingness to apologize when you’re wrong and pave the way for forgiveness. A common saying amongst people healing from addiction is “you are only as sick as your secrets.” Integrity means telling the truth – even when it’s uncomfortable – even when it can get you in trouble. I grew up stretching and bending the truth because I pushed and rebelled, and when I got caught, I didn’t want to get in trouble. Sure I escaped being punished, but years later, in a never-ending quest for more, I found myself in a different kind of trouble. I had fear and shame (emotional pain) and as a result I was “out of body” and on the never-ending quest for more.

I finally resolved to tell the truth, even if my voice shakes. I committed to show up and follow through with what I set out to do; I began creating art, making music and writing. As I cultivated my authenticity, vulnerability, and integrity, I started to experience a contentment I’d never known before, and was surprised to see my addictions lose their grip on me. I still work, eat, shop, drink, love, and of course use the internet, but none of these things dictate my days or nights and rather than feeling like it’s not enough, I feel gratitude for my life and what I’ve created.

I now know the aforementioned practices were immensely powerful because they served as building blocks for what I now know as self worth. While there are certainly many different pathways to healing from addiction, I’ve found it cowers in the face of true self-worth. I realized this one day, when I caught a glimpse of myself in the mirror, and felt sincere love and respect for the woman staring back at me, and it felt really good to be in her body.

A Lesson in Love: How to Be Your Own Best Friend

In the latest episode of The Chopra Well’s 30 DAYS OF INTENT, Iman and Natalie continue their therapy sessions with counselor Alyssa Nobriga, this time focusing on the difficult path to self-love and acceptance. Iman bravely recognizes the role he played in a recent traumatic breakup, saying, “It’s hard to forgive myself.” Natalie criticizes herself for missing several key passes, which, she says, ultimately marked the end of her professional soccer career.

Both struggle with self-acceptance in the face of these regrets, a feeling to which many can probably relate. Does self-love mean loving all of it – the faults and failures, too? To echo Natalie’s words in the previous episode, “How do you love the parts of yourself that are most misbehaving?” Better just to love our friends, our family, anybody else, than to spend too much time trying to fall in love with the one person we know best… Right?

“You can’t love anyone else until you learn to love yourself.”

You have undoubtedly heard this statement or something like it before. Society is quick to dole out such pockets of wisdom, especially to young people struggling with self-esteem. But honestly, doesn’t it sound like a bit of a threat? After all, it can be easier to love outwardly rather than turn that focus inward. We know ourselves better than anyone else, will spend more time with the self than any other person in our lives. But this depth of understanding and rapport means we also have an intimate knowledge of our own faults, fears, and mistakes. Now add to that the notion that we might not be loving others as fully as we could, just for a lack of self-love, and we might start feeling guilty, too.

Reality check… Love is love. If you feel it, then it’s most likely real. So don’t worry on that front. But that doesn’t mean self-love has no place in the equation. As Deepak Chopra would probably tell you, we are all expressions of consciousness, comprised of the same possibility waves that make up the entire universe. To know the self is to know the world; and to love the self is to love all of creation. Consider the aspects of yourself you can’t stand, the ones that get in the way of total self-acceptance. Would you love your spouse or mother or child in spite of those very same faults? Might you not even love the faults, themselves, for making that special person so beautiful and unique in your eyes?

Try this exercise:

Place two chairs facing one another, and sit in one of them. Here, you are the neutral “Self,” the one you embody most of the time. Describe the difficulty you have loving yourself, as though you’re talking to a friend. Maybe there is an old wound or regret you can’t metabolize. Maybe there is some bad habit or quirk you can’t shake, or something in your physical appearance you aren’t satisfied with. Lay it all out.

Now move to the opposite chair and sit down. Here, you are the “Best Friend,” who resides within you all the time, even if you don’t always hear her voice. From the perspective as a friend, respond to what you just said in the other chair. Tell the “Self” why she is beautiful and strong and perfect in your eyes. Explain to her why these “faults” make her who she is, and why you love the whole package.

Move to the other chair again. Did you hear what the “Best Friend” said? Continue in this way back and forth between the chairs, taking on these two perspectives, until you really take in what the “Best Friend” has to say. Let us know how it goes!

Subscribe to The Chopra Well and make self-love and acceptance a daily practice.

photo by: ♥serendipity

Thoughts on Vulnerability & Self-Worth

I’ve been working away on various writing projects and books, and as I go along, I occasionally find my Ego-mind kicking in with edits and revisions: "Don’t say that! Don’t put that out there! Wait, there’s a better way to say that so you won’t sound vulnerable. Twist it and spin it a bit! Quick, change it up!"

And so on.

Luckily, I know this Ego-mind voice well. When it shows up, I have trained myself to let it ramble on for a bit while I file my nails and sip my cappucino. The Ego-mind has very good intentions in most cases and is only working to protect itself. To be strong. To be powerful. To uphold an image. This inner dialogue will eventually pass, as it always does.

As I writer, I’ve come to a place where I truly value my ability to be vulnerable and raw. I love that I can put all of The Stuff out there and own it. It’s taken awhile to get there and it’s been an internal struggle along the way. But the reason why I love the ability to be incredibly truthful and real about my full human experience is because being vulnerable demonstrates true self-worth.

Vulernability says:

This is how I feel and it is important.

This is what I need and it matters.

This is me without any external image decorations and it is beautiful.

This is what I want and I deserve it.

This is who I am and I am perfect.

And so on.

I appreciate how predictable my Ego-mind has become when it kicks in with judgements about feelings, experiences, people and the past. It’s only trying to protect me from mistakes, keep me safe from potential harm or external judgments, and uphold an expiring paradigm of personal power. I get that.

However, there is greater Heart Power on the planet, and within ourselves, now than ever before, and that is occurring because we are all opening our hearts up wider and stronger. This is a new form of personal power that is connected to our True Self and as a result, there is nothing to fear. Or hide. Or protect. It’s time to shine brilliantly with full strength. It’s time to be vulnerable because it is safe to open up and be your True Self with the highest level of self worth and personal power. It’s time.

If you can relate at all to these thoughts, and are trying to figure out how to express something about yourself to a loved one, a superior, a friend or even just to yourself, you may also be hearing  that loud Ego-mind we all have. It tends to be the first to show up to the party, after all. But don’t let it dominate or take the reins for long. Just appreciate what it is trying to do for you without judgment. Let it dance around and be the star of the show, if need be.

Then gently usher it off to the sidelines so the bigger star, your True Self, can effortlessly shine. Go for it. Say your truth. Share your experiences. Be your full self. Because you matter, you are important and you deserve to be heard. Absolutely.

Thoughts on Vulnerability & Self-Worth

I’ve been working away on various writing projects and books, and as I go along, I occasionally find my Ego-mind kicking in with edits and revisions: "Don’t say that! Don’t put that out there! Wait, there’s a better way to say that so you won’t sound vulnerable. Twist it and spin it a bit! Quick, change it up!"

And so on.

Luckily, I know this Ego-mind voice well. When it shows up, I have trained myself to let it ramble on for a bit while I file my nails and sip my cappucino. The Ego-mind has very good intentions in most cases and is only working to protect itself. To be strong. To be powerful. To uphold an image. This inner dialogue will eventually pass, as it always does.

As I writer, I’ve come to a place where I truly value my ability to be vulnerable and raw. I love that I can put all of The Stuff out there and own it. It’s taken awhile to get there and it’s been an internal struggle along the way. But the reason why I love the ability to be incredibly truthful and real about my full human experience is because being vulnerable demonstrates true self-worth.

Vulernability says:

This is how I feel and it is important.

This is what I need and it matters.

This is me without any external image decorations and it is beautiful.

This is what I want and I deserve it.

This is who I am and I am perfect.

And so on.

I appreciate how predictable my Ego-mind has become when it kicks in with judgements about feelings, experiences, people and the past. It’s only trying to protect me from mistakes, keep me safe from potential harm or external judgments, and uphold an expiring paradigm of personal power. I get that.

However, there is greater Heart Power on the planet, and within ourselves, now than ever before, and that is occurring because we are all opening our hearts up wider and stronger. This is a new form of personal power that is connected to our True Self and as a result, there is nothing to fear. Or hide. Or protect. It’s time to shine brilliantly with full strength. It’s time to be vulnerable because it is safe to open up and be your True Self with the highest level of self worth and personal power. It’s time.

If you can relate at all to these thoughts, and are trying to figure out how to express something about yourself to a loved one, a superior, a friend or even just to yourself, you may also be hearing  that loud Ego-mind we all have. It tends to be the first to show up to the party, after all. But don’t let it dominate or take the reins for long. Just appreciate what it is trying to do for you without judgment. Let it dance around and be the star of the show, if need be.

Then gently usher it off to the sidelines so the bigger star, your True Self, can effortlessly shine. Go for it. Say your truth. Share your experiences. Be your Full Self. Because you matter, you are important and you deserve to be heard. Absolutely.

What Your Body Tells You: Objective Feedback vs. Critical Condemnation

Can you tell the difference between the objective feedback your body offers versus the critical condemnation of your mind?

Your body’s objective feedback can help you make lifestyle choices that promote your health and well-being, whereas the critical condemnation of your mind creates nothing but suffering.

What is your body telling you?Our bodies are incredible messengers, powerful gifts on the journey through life.  We can use the constant feedback that our bodies give us to help us make changes and adaptations to promote our health.  If we listen to the criticism of our minds, however, it will sabotage us.  The negative mental messages can eclipse the body’s natural intelligence and feedback, which will prevent us from making the healthy choices we want to make.

The mind opines, while the body illuminates.  The mind makes you mistakenly believe that your body means something about who you are as a person, your self-worth and your value.  It levels judgment and criticism.  It makes you believe that you are somehow not good enough, that something is wrong with you and your body.

Here are some examples to elucidate the point:

Objective Feedback vs. Critical Condemnation

  • "I am holding weight in my abdomen – I can tell I have been under a lot of stress."
    versus "My stomach is flabby and disgusting – I am out of shape and need to do more sit-ups."

  • "I haven’t been able to exercise recently and can tell that my legs are weak."
    versus "My cellulite is disgusting and I cringe when I look in the mirror."

  • "I notice that when I eat sugar regularly it leads to weight gain and is addictive."
    versus "Why can’t I control myself?  I am so weak."

  • "I can tell that my arms are becoming weak – it would be good for me to increase my upper-body strength."
    versus "My arms are flabby, weak, and I don’t even want to look at them."

  • "It has been too long without a haircut."
    versus "My hair is flat, dull, and disgusting."

The key is to use your body for valuable, useful feedback, and to disregard the worthless messages of criticism that come from mental conditioning.

Critical condemnation is when you use your body and appearance to:

  • Determine your self-worth

  • Use it as a reflection of your “success” or “failure”

  • Use it as a reflection of your “strength” or “weakness”

  • Use it as a reflection of being “good” or “bad”

Here are three helpful steps to help you use your body’s messages for objective feedback, while dropping the mind’s critical condemnation:

  1. Become increasingly aware of the difference between the body’s messages and the mind’s messages

  2. Separate the “wheat” from the “chaff” – use the objective feedback and drop the self-judgment, criticism, and condemnation

  3. Make lifestyle choices based on the feedback, not the condemnation

A key tool to help you learn to differentiate between your body’s messages and your mind’s messages is meditation.

A regular meditation practice is essential to help you break free from the critical mind-chatter that can sabotage your best intentions.

Sarah Maria, author of Love Your Body, Love Your Life, outlines her 5-step process for helping you feel great in and about your body.  Her work embraces the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual, for true, lasting healing.  Visit BreakFreeBeauty.com to learn more.

Is it socially acceptable (yet) to be wonderful?

For many years now I have worked with intentions and affirmations. I just realized today that there may be a gap between what we are encouraged to say in the mirror and what is "acceptable" to say out loud. I am left wondering if  it is reasonable (or wise) to state in company: "I am wonderful. I am good at what I do. I am grateful for my talents and gifts. I love myself. "

Of course it is welcome here on this site and for that I am very grateful, but may I, if I meet you in person, announce myself as a phenomenal woman? Well, I hope so, because I will. It seems like a bit of a dirty secret to only love myself in private, to only claim my power in the mirror. I want to live my affirmations and while I believe they show non-verbally, I still feel a taboo regarding affirming self to others.

Self love and self worth, in my opinion, are quite different than ego. There can be full humility in self love, just as there is in the love we extrend to others which sees both faults and graces, strengths and weakness, and offers forgiveness and compassion.

So here I am falling into the trap: Can I say I love myself out loud, without qualification? I want to tell you that I do see my faults, that I don’t think I am better than anyone, that it is a struggle to shine and not hide my light because I fear "the voices."

"Who the hell does she think she is?"

"How arrogant!"

"What about some humility, huh?"

"How about thinking of someone other than yourself?"

"How dare you!"

So in my discourse today, I found myself trying to back-pedal and I learned another interesting taboo: It is "acceptable" to wish for empowerment but not for power. I reached for the word "power" and found myself using "empowerment" instead which led me to question whether empowerment might be a diluted word we still use becuase of fear of plain old "power."

Is empowerment, as a word, self-limiting and still reserved for the type of power that is "safe" and socially acceptable? Further, does it have a connotation of being bestowed, regained, or retrieved and not already present? It felt weaker and safer to me. There may be a reason: Power gets abused, empowerment…doesn’t? I really don’t know but I was surprised in the difference in potency between the two words, and of course, that may just be me.

So yes, I write from a personal place because I want to own this and not to preach. And I use "acceptable" in quotes hopefully with the understanding that I do not agree or subscribe to the beliefs that limit our positive expressions, yet I have encountered them. I write to clarify my thoughts after a tough day of trying to stay centered and I write just in case someone else is struggling with being wonderful in public. If so, I will be glad to hear your voice, see your light, celebrate your wonderful being!

 

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