Tag Archives: suicide statistics

Brave Teenager’s Manifesto on Depression and Why We Need to Talk About It

DISTRESS

Kevin Breel has been living two lives for years. In one, he’s a smart, accomplished young man with friends and family who love him. In the other, he is someone who suffers from depression, and has for the better part of six years.

This may come as a shock, Kevin says, to the people who know him. After all, on the surface his life is great. Everything is fine; everything is going well. But underneath the surface, he “struggles intensely” with a condition that many of us know all to well and yet no one wants to talk about. Why is this?

Depression is stigmatized in our culture, Kevin says, and yet it is a massive issue. According to the World Health Organization, one person in the world dies by suicide every 40 seconds. Worldwide suicide rates have increased 60% in the last 45 years, and it is the second leading cause of death for people aged 10-24. On top of that, suicide attempts are 20 times more frequent than actual suicides, which means there is a staggering number of people in the world who are hurting, suffering, and desperately needing help.

Kevin uses a powerful analogy: When you break your arm, everyone runs over to sign your cast. When you say you’re depressed, everyone runs in the other direction. This has created a world in which we don’t understand mental health, we don’t understand our emotions, and we certainly don’t understand depression. Watch Kevin’s poignant TEDx talk:

In order to heal our hearts and our communities, Kevin entreats that we speak up, speak out, and learn to love ourselves. In the spirit of Suicide Prevention week, let’s not waste a minute to reach out to our fellow humans and spread the love.

Have you or someone you know suffered from depression? We would be honored for you to share your thoughts in the comments section below.

The Most Powerful Suicide-Prevention Ad You Will Ever See

Screen Shot 2013-06-25 at 11.26.55 AMYou’re walking through a crowded subway station on your way to work or school when something catches your eye. It’s a moving poster/screen showing a girl sitting in a bathtub, tears streaming down her face. She picks up a telephone and starts dialing – and miraculously at the same time, the payphone next to the poster starts ringing. What do you do?

The above describes a real ad-campaign run by Samaritans, a charity and confidential support group that offers phone-based counseling and suicide-prevention in the UK and Ireland. According to the organization’s website, every 52 seconds they receive contact from someone considering suicide. The organization trains volunteers –  more than 20,000 in a given year – to take these calls and offer the compassion and deep listening that often makes the difference between life and death. Because of the urgency of this work, though, there are never enough volunteers to fully make the impact Samaritans would like. Thus they initiated the “Let Us Not Miss A Single Call” ad-campaign with the hopes of spreading awareness and recruiting volunteers.

Take a look at the remarkable video that captures this powerful campaign:

In 2010, 38,364 people committed suicide in the United States. That’s roughly 105 people a day, 1 person every 13 minutes. Imagine how many of those lives might be saved if there were greater awareness about the organizations out there providing support and scores of volunteers at the ready to take the crisis calls. Samaritans’ ad isn’t subtle at all, and for good reason. Obviously some situations are more nuanced than others, and more support is often necessary. But the organization’s message is that in so many cases it really is as simple as answering the phone to prevent someone from committing suicide in that crucial moment.

What do you think of this poignant ad-campaign? Would you answer the phone?

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