Tag Archives: thankfulness

A Little Gratitude – Please and Thank-You

As our world continues to go through dramatic changes and shifts as we approach the end of 2012, we are all being called to serve. Every one of us has unique and individual ways we can serve others and the planet every day. I believe it is more important than ever to recognize this and to consciously act from a heart-centered place of sincere caring and concern.

My wonderfully spirited daughter Lani, who shines her light out into the world and serves others through her performing talents, also literally “serves” people every day at a family-oriented restaurant in midtown Toronto. From what others have told me, she shines particularly brightly at this, as well.

One particular incident that happened to her could have, and probably does, happen all the time to servers in towns and cities around the globe. At the time, her restaurant was offering a “buy one, get one free” entrée promotion to try to restore patrons’ confidence after a health scare that had been publicly blown out of proportion.

It was a busy Thursday night, and after serving what to her appeared to be a trustworthy family of four, she cheerfully left the billfold and check for them to pay when they were ready. No pressure and no sign of anything that in any way showed that they weren’t 100-percent happy. She went off, and in her efficient and enthusiastic way, she continued serving her other customers, making sure everyone was equally happy and enjoying their dining experience. Not too long after this, she returned to this family’s table and found that they had left the building, taking the billfold and check with them. Not only did they not leave a tip, but they didn’t even pay the bill! When she told me, I was shocked.

This family had already received two free entrees, and the bill was not high. In short, their actions showed a total lack of respect and gratitude for the restaurant, the food and their server. Because of restaurant policy, the server is responsible for the bill. Ouch! Her fellow servers rallied to support her; however, as we are all human, this understandably scarred her otherwise great day and night. It left both of us questioning how anyone could consciously behave in a premeditated way that so lacks integrity and illustrates an unflattering side of human nature: acting without gratitude.

Being who I am, I looked for a lesson in it, believing that there is always something to be learned in every situation by the people involved. Maybe the family was hungry and actually couldn’t afford to pay for the meal. Maybe the husband thought the wife paid or vice versa. Maybe there was a misunderstanding, because English was not the family’s first language. Maybe the actual reason doesn’t in fact even matter.

Trying to see the positive in it, I still find it challenging to understand why people forget to act from a place of gratitude and aren’t able to express it openly and freely to others, especially those who serve us, all the time. Have we lost the ability to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes and see what the view looks like from there? Is it really that difficult to consciously stay aware and display gratitude for service?

As I walked today, grateful for a glorious, sunny fall day, I found myself wondering when and if we as a people will be able to demonstrate genuine compassion and gratitude to others. Although it often happens in times of crisis, when we are called to rally together in community, why can’t we do it all the time?

What someone does for a living is not who they are as a person, but how someone treats another person does indicate the kind of person they are. What kind of lessons are adults like this teaching their children? I don’t have the definitive answers, but I believe we can all start by taking personal responsibility for how we choose to interact in the world. The law of karma tells us that what goes around always comes around, making it important to make gratitude a daily practice, both personally and by showing it to others. Conscious intention is one place to start.

I know my rose-coloured glass optimism keeps me somewhat naive, but I honestly do believe that people are good, trustworthy and honourable, and I see expressions of gratitude all the time, everywhere I look, more often than not.  During this time of Thanksgiving, I encourage us all to keep gratitude alive and well; it is really such a simple thing to practice. I’d love to hear stories from others, servers or not, of how grateful or ungrateful behavior has impacted their lives.

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”
–John F. Kennedy

Visit me at: www.beverleygolden.com  or follow me on Twitter: @goldenbeverley

Thanking the Divine: A Graceful Approach to Food

When I was a child, not a meal passed when we didn’t “say grace.” Someone , usually my father, would take a meaningful pause. We would all bow our heads and he would begin, “Thank you for this meal that you have put before us.” The prayer only lasted a minute and as a child I found it mostly an annoying ritual that delayed my dinner. On the big occasions like Thanksgiving and Christmas, granddad had the honors and saying grace was more solemn and potent. Today I grapple with how to incorporate this into a daily routine. Sometimes with friends who also feel deeply spiritual one of us will say a prayer, chant or mantra before we begin to eat. Though we are of different religious backgrounds, Sikh, Hindu and Christian, we pray to the one God with many forms.

But in public and with friends and colleagues who don’t seem particularly interested in spiritual practice I pause before eating and repeat words of gratitude silently to myself. Sometimes my table companions recognize the pause, but most of the time they’re absorbed in other things and don’t. Saying grace in the traditional sense means, “a short prayer before or after a meal in which a blessing is asked for and thanks given,” according to Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary. The word grace derives from Middle English and Old French. It probably reaches back to Latin and we hear it in romance languages. In Italian the words for “thank you” are closely related to grace. They are “grazie” and in Spanish it becomes “gracias.”

During meals today, take a moment to remember the Divine. Say grace in whatever way or form appeals to you. Pause before the meal and enjoy the scents and sights of the food. Consider the hands that prepared it and the Earth that gave birth to it. Food connects us to many people in the process of getting to our tables. By saying grace and being thankful for the food, the blessings extend out to all who helped bring it to you.

Bio: Debra Moffitt is author of Awake in the World: 108 Practices to Live a Divinely Inspired Life (Llewellyn Worldwide, 2011). She is devoted to nurturing the spiritual in everyday life.  Debra leads workshops on spiritual practices at the Sophia Institute and other venues in the U.S. and Europe. Her mind/body/spirit articles, essays and stories appear in publications around the world and were broadcast by BBC World Services Radio. Find out more at: http://awakeintheworld.com and http://www.debramoffitt.com.

A Little Gratitude for Servers, Please and Thank-You

 As our world continues to go through dramatic changes and shifts, we are all being called to serve.  Every one of us have unique and individual ways we can serve others and the planet every day.  I believe it is more important than ever to recognize this and to consciously act from a heart centered place of sincere caring and concern.

My wonderfully spirited daughter Lani, who shines her light out into the world and serves others through her performing talents, also literally “serves” people every day at a family oriented, midtown restaurant in Toronto.  From what others have told me, she shines particularly brightly at this as well. 

 

What happened to her recently could have, and probably does, happen all the time to servers in towns and cities around the globe.  Her restaurant was offering a “buy one, get one free” entrée promotion to try to restore confidence, after a health scare that had been publicly blown out of proportion.  It was a busy Thursday night and after serving what to her, appeared to be a trustworthy family of four, she cheerfully left the billfold and check for them to pay, when they were ready.  No pressure and no sign of anything that in any way showed they weren’t 100% happy.  She went off, and in her efficient and enthusiastic way, continued serving her other customers, making sure everyone was equally happy and enjoying their dining experience.  Not too long after this, she returned to this family’s table and found they had left the building, taking the billfold and check with them.  Not only did they not leave a tip, they did not even pay the bill!  When she told me, I was shocked.

 

This family had already received two free entrées and although the bill was not a lot, their actions showed a total lack of respect and gratitude for the restaurant, the food and their server.  Because of restaurant policy, the server is responsible for the bill.  Ouch!  Her fellow servers rallied to support her, however, understandably as we are all human, this scarred her otherwise great day and night.  It left both of us  questioning how anyone could consciously and pre-meditatively behave in a way that so lacks integrity, illustrating an unflattering side of human nature; acting without  gratitude.

 

Being who I am, I looked for a lesson in it, believing there is always something to be learned in every situation, by the people involved.  Maybe the family was hungry and actually couldn’t afford to pay for the meal.  Maybe the husband thought the wife paid or vice versa.  Maybe there was a misunderstanding because English was not the family’s first language.  Trying to see the positive in it, I still find it difficult to understand why people forget to act from a place of gratitude and aren’t able to express it openly and freely to others, especially those who serve us, all the time.  Have we lost the ability to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes and see what the view looks like from there?  Is it really that difficult to stay aware and display gratitude for service?  

 

As I walked today, grateful for a glorious almost spring-like day, I found myself wondering when and if we as a people will be able to demonstrate genuine compassion and gratitude to others, not just in times of crisis when we are called to rally together, but all the time.  What someone does for a living is not who they are as a person, but what someone does to another person, does indicate the kind of person they are.  What kind of lessons are adults like this teaching their children?  I don’t have the definitive answers, but I believe we can all start by taking personal responsibility for how we choose to interact in the world.  The law of karma tells us that what goes around always comes around, making it important to make gratitude a daily practice, both personally and by showing it to others. Conscious intention is one place to start.

 

I’d love to hear stories from other servers of how either grateful or ungrateful behavior has impacted their lives.  If the family who left without paying, by some chance reads this, it is never too late to show up and make it right.  I know my rose coloured glass optimism keeps me somewhat naive, but I honestly do believe that people are  good and trustworthy and honourable and I see expressions of gratitude all the time, everywhere I look, more often than not.  Keep gratitude alive and well; it is really such a simple thing to practice.

 

Gratitude is the best attitude.  ~Author Unknown

Listening and Thankfulness

 I’ve always believed that the universe is constantly supporting all that you do and want. From when I was perhaps 2 years old I knew that the universe is always giving you messages. I know that the times that I have listened I was made stronger and the times I have not listen I felt lost. I go in and out of listening to the universe. I am now working on constantly listening because my eyes have been opened to the fact that 1. it does listen to you and 2. what you put out there truly does come back to you. This site has certainly reenforced that for me. What has been great is the support provided my members of this site. There is truly strength in numbers.  So, I write this to say thank you to all the members of this site. I was in a dark place searching for my community and the universe led me to you. I asked for you and I received — how wonderful is that. 🙂

@intentdotcom Asked: What Are You Thankful For? (Read How Our Community Answered)

Here at Intent.com, we have started a tradition of encouraging our community members to share with the rest of the community what they are thankful for every Thursday and tag their gratitude intent #thankfulthursday.

In addition to posting it on Intent.com, we absolutely love it when our community members also respond to our #thankfulthursday meme via our Twitter handle (@intentdotcom) or on our Facebook page (facebook.com/intentdotcom).

The responses from the community are absolutely awesome. (One member posted she is thankful for her recently discovered pregnancy–congratulations!) We loved the responses so much we decided that we want to start a new tradition: share these responses on Intent.com with everyone else in the commumity.

Here are the responses we received via Twitter for last week’s #thankfulthursday:

And here are the responses we received Facebook:

 

Thank you all of you for your active participation and positive energy. We look forward to seeing more of your responses to our questions in the coming weeks! 

Want to join the conversation with the rest of the Intent commumity?  Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. We promise you will meet some really cool people.

 

 

For whom am I thankful for? And Why? What is being Thankful imply? Why is it critical for me to understand its implications?

For whom am I really thakful for during this Thanksgiving day?  Why am I thankful for each one of them? What are the true implications of being thankful?  What does it really mean?  Do I really understand the meaning of the word? Why is it critical for me to understand the true meaning and its implications?

How can I etch it permanently in my mind, body, soul and spirit that I am really thankful?  Whom should I be thankful for?  Can I really mean, if I can fathom its true meaning?  Do I have to let the people I am thankful for know or they should simply understand?  Should I also hold up for them to express their thankfulness for my thankfulness?  Where does the cycle begin and where does it end?

I am thankful for my immediate family in the USA.  They have given me a place to come home to and call home.  My wife and three kids have become my identity and this will be the case until I turn 100.  Hence this entire unit deserves my first dose of thankfulness.

I should also thank this country, USA.  I must thank the men in the military who have made the freedom possible for all of us, no matter which wars they have served or will be serving.  All those who have made the extreme sacrifices and all those who aspire to keep the freedom going deserves this thankfulness.

I am also thankful for the extended support system both in the US and in India. This support keeps my family strong.

I must be thankful for various Internet groups such as at Intent.com.  All of the team and members have made this interesting.

I must also be thankful for all my teachers, mentors and educators who have enabled me to become curious about life, which led to me finally writing down my goals and hopefully I can start pursuing and meeting some of those goals.  I am also thankful to all my customers everywhere.

But what about the people who are not listed here?  What if I may think that they don’t matter but they indeed really do, either for me or for someone else who I think really matter?  The chances are high that we all connected in some form and I must be overall thankful for all the people things that matter to me and all others who I think at this moment may not matter to me but in reality they may matter to me and definitely they or that may matter to someone who matter to me directly!  What is it that I am going to lose if I am thank for all who matter AND all who may or may not matter?

Being thankful will imply being really grateful.  Being happy having met the people affected and being happy about having the people to love and share my life and ideas.  Men can’t live on bread alone.  We all need relationships to sustain us and our spirit.  These relationships when deepened through conscious and subconscious thankfulness at the core makes this world a better place.

So, the question is for whom are you thankful for and what does being thankful mean to you?

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